See also: Chink

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /tʃɪŋk/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪŋk

Etymology 1Edit

Of uncertain origin; but apparently an extension (with formative -k) of Middle English chine, from Old English ċine (a crack, chine, chink), equivalent to chine +‎ -k.

Alternatively, the -k may represent an earlier unrecorded diminutive, perhaps from Middle English *chinek, making it equivalent to chine +‎ -ock (diminutive ending).

NounEdit

chink (plural chinks)

  1. A narrow opening such as a fissure or crack.
  2. A chip or dent in something metallic.
    The warrior saw a chink in her enemy's armor, and aimed her spear accordingly.
  3. (figuratively) A vulnerability or flaw in a protection system or in any otherwise formidable system.
    The chink in the theory is that the invaders have superior muskets.
    • 2011 January 30, Kevin Darling, “Arsenal 2 - 1 Huddersfield”, in BBC[1]:
      The first chink in Arsenal's relaxed afternoon occurred when key midfielder Samir Nasri pulled up with a hamstring injury and was replaced.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

chink (third-person singular simple present chinks, present participle chinking, simple past and past participle chinked)

  1. (transitive) To fill an opening such as the space between logs in a log house with chinking; to caulk.
    to chink a wall
  2. (intransitive) To crack; to open.
  3. (transitive) To cause to open in cracks or fissures.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Onomatopoeic.

NounEdit

chink (plural chinks)

  1. A slight sound as of metal objects touching each other; a clink.
    • 2020, Abi Daré, The Girl With The Louding Voice, Sceptre, page 138:
      She swallow, set the cup down like she want to break it, and the ice-blocks jump, make a chink sound.
  2. (colloquial, now rare) Ready money, especially in the form of coins.
    • 1834, David Crockett, A Narrative of the Life of, Nebraska 1987, pp. 47-8:
      I thought that if all the hills about there were pure chink, and all belonged to me, I would give them if I could just talk to her when I wanted to []
    • 1727, William Somerville, Occasional Poems, The Fortune-Hunter:
      to leave his chink to better hands
    • 1855, Henry Augustus Wise, Tales for the Marines (page 121)
      At the same time, mind, I must have a bit of a frolic occasionally, for that's all the pleasure I has, when I gets a little chink in my becket; and ye know, too, that I don t care much for that stuff, for a dollar goes with me as fur as a gold ounce does with you, when ye put on your grand airs, and shower it about like a nabob.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

chink (third-person singular simple present chinks, present participle chinking, simple past and past participle chinked)

  1. (intransitive) To make a slight sound like that of metal objects touching.
    The coins were chinking in his pocket.
  2. (transitive) To cause to make a sharp metallic sound, as coins, small pieces of metal, etc., by bringing them into collision with each other.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

chink (plural chinks)

  1. Alternative form of kink (gasp for breath)

VerbEdit

chink (third-person singular simple present chinks, present participle chinking, simple past and past participle chinked)

  1. Alternative form of kink (gasp for breath)

Etymology 4Edit

NounEdit

chink (plural chinks)

  1. Alternative letter-case form of Chink

AnagramsEdit