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EnglishEdit

NounEdit

cive (plural cives)

  1. Obsolete form of chive (the herb).

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French cive, from Latin cēpa, caepa.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cive f (plural cives)

  1. chive

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin cīvem, accusative of cīvis, from Proto-Italic *keiwis (society), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱéy-wo-s (intimate, friendly), derived from the root *ḱey- (to settle).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈt͡ʃi.ve/, [ˈt͡ʃiːve]
  • Rhymes: -ive
  • Hyphenation: cì‧ve

NounEdit

cive m (plural civi)

  1. (literary, obsolete) citizen
    • 1321, Dante Alighieri, La divina commedia: Purgatorio [The Divine Comedy: Purgatory] (paperback), Bompiani, published 2001, Canto XXXII, lines 100–102, page 498:
      Qui sarai tu poco tempo silvano; ¶ e sarai meco senza fine cive ¶ di quella Roma onde Cristo è romano.
      Short while shalt thou be here a forester, and thou shalt be with me for evermore a citizen of that Rome where Christ is Roman.
    Synonym: cittadino

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French civé.

NounEdit

cive

  1. Alternative form of cyvee

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English sife.

NounEdit

cive

  1. Alternative form of sive

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cēpa, caepa.

NounEdit

cive f (oblique plural cives, nominative singular cive, nominative plural cives)

  1. (often in the plural) chive

DescendantsEdit