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See also: clavó

Contents

AsturianEdit

VerbEdit

clavo

  1. first-person singular present indicative of clavar

CatalanEdit

VerbEdit

clavo

  1. first-person singular present indicative form of clavar

LatinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From clāvus +‎ .

VerbEdit

clāvō (present infinitive clāvāre, perfect active clāvāvī, supine clāvātum); first conjugation

  1. I nail, furnish, fasten with nails.
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

clāvō

  1. dative singular of clāvus
  2. ablative singular of clāvus

ReferencesEdit


SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈklabo/, [ˈklaβo]

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Spanish clavo, from Latin clāvus, from Proto-Italic *klāwos, from Proto-Indo-European *kleh₂u-. First attested in the 12th century. The word underwent a delayed phonetic evolution (as evidenced by the atypical conservation of the consonant cluster -cl-, which normally becomes -ll- in inherited Spanish), probably due to the pronunciation used by the upper classes, as with the case of claro (cf. other irregular cases such as flor, plato). Despite this, it is difficult to view the word as a learned or semi-learned borrowing[1]. Compare Portuguese cravo.

NounEdit

clavo m (plural clavos)

  1. nail, spike
  2. clove
  3. corn (callus)
  4. headache
  5. scab
  6. (Dominican Republic, slang) stash
SynonymsEdit
  • (spike):
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

VerbEdit

clavo

  1. First-person singular (yo) present indicative form of clavar.

Further readingEdit

ReferencesEdit


Zacatlán-Ahuacatlán-Tepetzintla NahuatlEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish clavo, from Latin clāvus.

NounEdit

clavo

  1. nail

ReferencesEdit

  • Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, A.C. (2006) Pequeño diccionario ilustrado: Náhuatl de los municipios de Zacatlán, Tepetzintla y Ahuacatlán[1], segunda edición edition, Tlalpan, D.F. México: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, A.C., page 22