See also: clóis and Clois

IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish cloisid, cloistid, apparently a conflation of coistid (is silent, listens) with clúas (hearing). Coistid is a late form of con·túaisi, from Proto-Celtic *tawsos (silent) (compare Old Irish tóe (silent), Welsh taw (be silent)), from Proto-Indo-European *teh₂ws- (still, silent) (compare Sanskrit तूष्णीम् (tūṣṇīm, silently). Clos is related to clúas (hearing, ear), from Proto-Celtic *kloustā (hearing, ear) (compare Welsh clust), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱlewst- (compare Old English hlyst (hearing)), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱlew- (to hear).

The past tense forms are suppletive and originally belonged to cluin, itself from Old Irish ro·cluinethar.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

clois (present analytic cloiseann, future analytic cloisfidh, verbal noun cloisteáil, past participle cloiste)

  1. (Munster, parts of Connacht) to hear

ConjugationEdit

SynonymsEdit

  • cluin (Ulster; parts of Connacht)

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
clois chlois gclois
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit


WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

clois

  1. first-person singular preterite of cloi

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
clois glois nghlois chlois
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.