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GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese [Term?], from Vulgar Latin *cocēre, from Latin coquere, present active infinitive of coquō.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

cocer (first-person singular present cozo, first-person singular preterite coín, past participle coido)

  1. to simmer
  2. first-person singular personal infinitive of cocer
  3. third-person singular personal infinitive of cocer

ConjugationEdit


Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

West Germanic *kokar-, whence also Old Frisian koker, Old Saxon kokar (Dutch koker), Old High German kohhār (German Köcher). The origin of the West Germanic word is unknown, but note that a similar word can be found in Turkic and Mongolic languages: see Proto-Mongolic *kökexür for more.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cocer m

  1. a quiver for arrows
  2. a case, container
  3. a sheath

DescendantsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Spanish, from Vulgar Latin *cocēre, from Latin coquere, present active infinitive of coquō, from Proto-Italic *kʷekʷō, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *pekʷ- (to cook, become ripe). Some conjugated forms of the verb were reformed through analogy with the infinitive; in Old Spanish, the forms cueza and cuezo were cuega and cuego, respectively, coció was coxo, and the past participle was cocho instead of cocido[1].

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

cocer (first-person singular present cuezo, first-person singular preterite cocí, past participle cocido)

  1. to boil
    cocer a fuego lento - simmer
  2. (reflexive, cocerse) to brew
    Algo se está cociendo
  3. (takes a reflexive pronoun) to chafe (get sore)

ConjugationEdit

  • Rule: o becomes ue in stressed syllables; c becomes a z before a or o.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit