See also: coïncident

English

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Etymology

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PIE word
*ḱóm
PIE word
*h₁én

The adjective is borrowed from French coïncident, from Medieval Latin coincidentem,[1][2] an accusative singular form of Latin coincidēns (coinciding), the present active participle of coincidō (to coincide), from co- (variant of con- (prefix denoting a being or bringing together of several objects)) + incidō (to fall into any condition) (ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ḱh₂d- (to fall)).

The noun is derived from the adjective.[1]

Pronunciation

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Adjective

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coincident (comparative more coincident, superlative most coincident)

  1. Of two or more objects: being in the same location.
  2. Of two or more events: occurring at the same time; contemporaneous.
  3. Of two or more things: having the same qualities; being in accordance; consonant, matching.
    • 1610 October, John Foxe, “The Letter of Gregory to the Patriarch of Alexandria”, in Actes and Monuments of Matters Most Speciall and Memorable, Happening in the Church, with an Vniuersall Historie of the Same. [], 6th edition, volume I, London: [] [Humphrey Lownes] for the Company of Stationers, →OCLC, book, marginal note, page 14, column 1:
      [A] biſhop is he to whomſoeuer the publike cure and charge of ſoules is committed, without any limitation of place. And ſo the name of biſhop is coincident with the office of apoſtle, or any publike paſtor, doctor, or curat of the vniuerſall flocke of Chriſt.
    • 1679, Robert South, “Sermon VI. Why Christ's Doctrine was Rejected by the Jews. John VII. 17..”, in Sermons Preached upon Several Occasions. [], new edition, volume I, London: [] Thomas Tegg, [], published 1843, →OCLC, page 100:
      For, say they, the whole doctrine of Christianity teaches nothing but what is perfectly suitable to, and coincident with, the ruling principles; that a virtuous and well-inclined man is acted by and with the main interest that he proposes to himself.
      The spelling has been modernized.
    • 1787, Ottobah Cugoano, Thoughts and Sentiments on the Evil and Wicked Traffic of the Slavery and Commerce of the Human Species, [], London: [s.n.], published c. 1950?, →OCLC, page 4:
      As to any other laws that slave-holders may make among themselves, as respecting slaves, they can be of no better kind, nor give them any better character, than what is implied in the common report—that there may be some honesty among thieves. This may seem a harsh comparison, but the parallel is so coincident that, I must say, I can find no other way of expressing my Thoughts and Sentiments, without making use of some harsh words and comparisons against the carriers on of such abandoned wickedness.
      A modern typescript of the original without any imprint information.
  4. (obsolete) Chiefly followed by to: accompanying, concomitant, incident.

Synonyms

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Antonyms

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Derived terms

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Translations

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Noun

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coincident (plural coincidents)

  1. (obsolete) One of multiple incidents or things which coincide with each other; a concomitant.
    • a. 1639 (date written), Henry Wotton, “[Letters, &c. and Characters of Sundry Personages, [].] My Deare Nic. Pey.”, in Reliquiæ Wottonianæ. Or, A Collection of Lives, Letters, Poems; [], London: [] Thomas Maxey, for R[ichard] Marriot, G[abriel] Bedel, and T[imothy] Garthwait, published 1651, →OCLC, page 507:
      In truth, vve thought it (coming immediately from an infected place) an hazardous incivilitie, to put our ſelves upon them; for if any ſiniſter accident had fallen out about the ſame time (for Coincidents are not alvvaies Cauſes) vve ſhould have rued it for ever.
    • 1658 November 18 (Gregorian calendar), John Evelyn, “[Epistolary Correspondence.] To Edward Thurland, Esq.”, in William Bray, editor, Memoirs, Illustrative of the Life and Writings of John Evelyn, [], 2nd edition, volume II, London: Henry Colburn, []; and sold by John and Arthur Arch, [], published 1819, →OCLC, part I, page 126:
      [] I despayre of ever living to see a man truely noble indeede: they may be called "My Lord;" titles and sounds and inferior trifles; but when Virtue and blood are coincidents, they both add lustre and mutual excellencys.
    • 1808 December 14, S[amuel] T[aylor] Coleridge, “From the Same [letter from Coleridge to Humphry Davy]”, in Humphry Davy, edited by John Davy, Fragmentary Remains, Literary and Scientific, of Sir Humphry Davy, [], London: John Churchill, [], published 1858, →OCLC, page 106:
      When I was in London I was shocked at the alteration in our friend Tobin's looks and appearance. Those who always interpret two coincidents into cause and effect would surmise that marriage has been less conducive to his health than to his moral comfort. It would give me serious pleasure to have a more cheerful account of him.

References

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  1. 1.0 1.1 Compare coincident, adj. and n.”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, September 2023.
  2. ^ coincident, adj.”, in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present, reproduced from Stuart Berg Flexner, editor in chief, Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2nd edition, New York, N.Y.: Random House, 1993, →ISBN.

Further reading

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Anagrams

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Latin

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Verb

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coincident

  1. third-person plural future active indicative of coincidō

Romanian

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Etymology

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Borrowed from French coïncident.

Adjective

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coincident m or n (feminine singular coincidentă, masculine plural coincidenți, feminine and neuter plural coincidente)

  1. coincident

Declension

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