English

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Etymology 1

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color +‎ -ate.

Pronunciation

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Verb

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colorate (third-person singular simple present colorates, present participle colorating, simple past and past participle colorated)

  1. To apply color to something; to make colorful.

Etymology 2

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Latin colōrātus, past participle of colōrō (I color).

Pronunciation

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Adjective

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colorate (comparative more colorate, superlative most colorate)

  1. (obsolete) Colored.
    • 1691, John Ray, The Wisdom of God Manifested in the Works of the Creation. [], London: [] Samuel Smith, [], →OCLC:
      had the tunicles and humours of the eye , all , or any of them , been colorate , many of the rays proceeding from the viſible object would have been stopped and ſuffocated before they could come to the bottom

Italian

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Etymology 1

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Verb

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colorate

  1. inflection of colorare:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative

Etymology 2

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Participle

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colorate f pl

  1. feminine plural of colorato

Anagrams

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Latin

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Verb

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colōrāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of colōrō

References

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  • colorate”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • colorate in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.

Spanish

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Verb

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colorate

  1. second-person singular voseo imperative of colorar combined with te