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LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From competēns +‎ -ia, from competō (I meet, coincide, agree)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

competentia f (genitive competentiae); first declension

  1. agreement, symmetry, correspondence
  2. (of the stars) conjunction
  3. (Medieval Latin) competence, expertise
    • 1251, letter from Adam Marsh to Robert Grosseteste
      • In: 2006, The Letters of Adam Marsh. Volume I. Edited and translated by C. H. Lawrence, pages 54–55:
        Super litterature competentia uestra uobis sufficiunt experimenta.
        As for his competence in letters your own test will suffice for you.
      • In: 2012, Monumenta Franciscana. Volume I. Edited by J. S. Brewer and Richard Howlett, page 108:
        Super litteraturæ competentia vestra vobis sufficiunt experimenta.
    • 1739, Traugott Thomasius, Problema iuris civilis an debitor pecuniam ob beneficium competentiae, page 8:
      Ob mutuam itaque catitatem et reuerentiam, personis quibusdam debitam, ex aequitate Praetoris introductum esse beneficium competentiae recte coniecturatur OTTO, quia omnes ICti in libris ad Edictum illud explicarunt.

InflectionEdit

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative competentia competentiae
genitive competentiae competentiārum
dative competentiae competentiīs
accusative competentiam competentiās
ablative competentiā competentiīs
vocative competentia competentiae

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit