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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Back-formation from complicity, most likely, which from French complicité, from complice (partner, accomplice), from Latin complex, complicem (partner).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /kəmˈplɪs.ɪt/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪsɪt

AdjectiveEdit

complicit (comparative more complicit, superlative most complicit)

  1. Associated with or participating in an activity, especially one of a questionable nature.
    • 1861, Henry M. Wheeler, The Slaves' Champion, page 203:
      It [slavery] has set the seal of a complicit, guilty silence upon the most orthodox pulpits and the saintliest tongues, []
    • 1973, Angus Wilson, As If by Magic, Secker and Warburg, p. 177:
      "I confess," and the Englishman turned with a near complicit grin to Hamo, "I have certain vulgar tastes myself."
    • 2005, Larry Dennsion, "Letters," Time, 7 March:
      Khan's sale of nuclear secrets and a complicit Pakistani government have made the world a ticking time bomb.

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