comport

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old French comporter, from Latin comportare (to bring together), from com- (together) + portare (to carry).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kəmˈpɔː(ɹ)t/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)t

VerbEdit

comport (third-person singular simple present comports, present participle comporting, simple past and past participle comported)

  1. (obsolete, transitive, intransitive) To tolerate, bear, put up (with). [16th–19th c.]
    to comport with an injury
  2. (intransitive) To be in agreement (with); to be of an accord. [from 16th c.]
    The new rules did not seem to comport with the spirit of the club.
  3. (reflexive) To behave (in a given manner). [from 17th c.]
    She comported herself with grace.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

comport

  1. (obsolete) Manner of acting; conduct; deportment.

RomanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

comport

  1. first-person singular present indicative of comporta
  2. first-person singular present subjunctive of comporta