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EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old Northern French compost (mixture of leaves, manure, etc., for fertilizing land" also "condiment), from Latin compositus (composed, compouspanind), from componere. Doublet of compote, which was taken from modern French, and composite.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈkɒmpɒst/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈkɑmpoʊst/
  • Hyphenation: com‧post

NounEdit

compost (countable and uncountable, plural composts)

  1. The decayed remains of organic matter that has rotted into a natural fertilizer.
    Dig plenty of compost into clay or sandy soil to improve its structure.
    • Shakespeare
      And do not spread the compost on the weeds / To make them ranker.
    • 2014 April 21, Mary Keen, “You can still teach an old gardener new tricks: Even the hardiest of us gardeners occasionally learn useful new techniques [print version: Gardening is always ready to teach even the hardiest of us a few new tricks, 19 April 2014]”, in The Daily Telegraph (Gardening)[1], page G7:
      [T]he very wet winter will have washed much of the goodness out of the soil. Homemade compost and the load of manure we get from a friendly farmer may not be enough to compensate for what has leached from the ground.
  2. (obsolete) A mixture; a compound.
    • Hammond
      A sad compost of more bitter than sweet.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

compost (third-person singular simple present composts, present participle composting, simple past and past participle composted)

  1. To produce compost, let organic matter decay into fertilizer.
    If you compost your grass clippings, you can improve your soil.

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See alsoEdit

  • mulch (sometimes used interchangeably with compost)
  • humus

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Occitan, from Latin compostus, syncopated variant of compositus.

AdjectiveEdit

compost (feminine composta, masculine plural composts or compostos, feminine plural compostes)

  1. compound
    ull compost
    compound eye

VerbEdit

compost

  1. past participle of compondre

Etymology 2Edit

From the above, possibly influenced by English compost.

NounEdit

compost m (plural composts or compostos)

  1. compost
Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English compost.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kɔmˈpɔst/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: com‧post
  • Rhymes: -ɔst

NounEdit

compost m or n (uncountable)

  1. compost, natural fertilizer produced by decaying organic matter

Derived termsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From a substantivation and specialization of old Norman compost, from (Old Northern French), Old French composte (mixture of leaves, manure, etc., for fertilizing land; condiment), from Latin compostus, syncopated variant of compositus (composed, compound), from componere. Modern French spelling influenced by English (compare the modern Norman spelling compôt, which is the expected form). Doublet of compote and composite.

NounEdit

compost m (plural composts)

  1. compost, natural fertilizer produced by decaying organic matter

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English compost. Doublet of composto.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkompost/
  • Hyphenation: còm‧post

NounEdit

compost m (invariable)

  1. compost

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin compostus, syncopated variant of compositus, from compōnō (I arrange, compile, compose, make up).

AdjectiveEdit

compost m (oblique and nominative feminine singular composte)

  1. composed (of)

DescendantsEdit


SpanishEdit

NounEdit

compost m (plural composts)

  1. compost
    Synonym: composta

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit