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EnglishEdit

NounEdit

conde (plural condes)

  1. Alternative spelling of conn
  2. The duty of directing a ship, usually used with the verb to have or to take and accompanied by the article "the."
    The officer of the deck has the conde of the vessel.
    The captain took the conde when he reached the bridge.

VerbEdit

conde (third-person singular simple present condes, present participle conding, simple past and past participle conded)

  1. (transitive, rare) To direct a ship.
    The pilot conded the ship safely into the harbor.

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin comes, comitem.

NounEdit

conde m (plural condes)

  1. count (the male ruler of a county)

Related termsEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese conde (count), from Latin comitem, accusative of comes (companion).

NounEdit

conde m (plural condes, feminine condesa, feminine plural condesas)

  1. count (the male ruler of a county)

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

conde

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of condō

Middle DutchEdit

PortugueseEdit

 
Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese conde (count), from Latin comitem, accusative of comes (companion).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

conde m (plural condes, feminine condessa, feminine plural condessas)

  1. count (the male ruler of a county)

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • conde” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin comitem (the 'o' being stressed and the 'i' disappearing), accusative of comes (companion). Ultimately cognate to English count (nobility).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkonde/, [ˈkõn̪d̪e]

NounEdit

conde m (plural condes, feminine condesa, feminine plural condesas)

  1. count (nobility); countess in the feminine sense.

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit