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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French condiment, from Latin condimentum, from condire (to preserve, pickle, season). See condite and compare recondite.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

condiment (plural condiments)

  1. Something used to enhance the flavor of food; for example, salt or pepper.
    • 1994 July 21, Faye Fiore, “Congress relishes another franking privilege: Meat lobby puts on the dog with exclusive luncheon for lawmakers – experts on pork”, in Los Angeles Times[1]:
      Congressmen gleefully wolfed down every imaginable version of the hot dog – smoked kielbasas, jumbo grillers, Big & Juicy's, kosher dogs and spiced dogs – topped with every imaginable condiment – hot mustard, sweet mustard, jalapenos, spaghetti sauce, regular relish, corn relish, maple syrup salsa and the secret sauce of Rep. Jack Kingston (R-Ga.). ("If I told you the recipe," an aide explained, "I'd have to shoot you.")

HyponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

VerbEdit

condiment (third-person singular simple present condiments, present participle condimenting, simple past and past participle condimented)

  1. (transitive) To season with condiments.
  2. (transitive) To pickle.

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin condīmentum.

NounEdit

condiment m (plural condiments)

  1. condiment

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin condīmentum.

NounEdit

condiment m (plural condiments)

  1. condiment

Further readingEdit