Last modified on 15 December 2014, at 23:01

conjunctive

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin coniunctivus (serving to connect), from coniunctus, past participle of coniungere; compare conjoin. From late 15th c; grammatical sense from 1660s.

AdjectiveEdit

conjunctive (not comparable)

  1. (astrology, astronomy) Relating to a conjunction (appearance in the sky of two astronomical objects with the same right ascension or the same ecliptical longitude).
  2. (grammar) Relating to a conjunction (part of speech).
  3. (grammar) Relating to the conjunctive mood.
  4. (grammar) Of a personal pronoun, used only in immediate conjunction with the verb of which the pronoun is the subject, such as French je or Irish
  5. (grammar, of a verb) Subjunctive: inflected to indicate that an act or state of being is possible, contingent or hypothetical, and not a fact.
  6. (logic) Of or relating to logical conjunction.
  7. (obsolete) Closely united.

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