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CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cōnsentiō.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

consentir (first-person singular present consenteixo, past participle consentit)

  1. to consent, to permit

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

First attested in the 10th century, Borrowing from Latin cōnsentiō.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

consentir

  1. to consent

ConjugationEdit

This is one of a fairly large group of irregular -ir verbs that are all conjugated the same way. Other members of this group include sortir and dormir. The most significant difference between these verbs' conjugation and that of the regular -ir verbs is that these verbs' conjugation does not use the infix -iss-. Further, this conjugation has the forms (je, tu) consens and (il) consent in the present indicative and imperative, whereas a regular -ir verb would have *consentis and *consentit (as in the past historic).

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

First attested in the 10th century, Borrowing from Latin cōnsentiō.

VerbEdit

consentir

  1. to consent

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a third-group verb. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

DescendantsEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cōnsentiō.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

consentir (first-person singular present indicative consinto, past participle consentido)

  1. to agree to; to allow; to permit
  2. to consent

ConjugationEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cōnsentiō.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /konsenˈtiɾ/, [kõnsẽn̪ˈt̪iɾ]

VerbEdit

consentir (first-person singular present consiento, first-person singular preterite consentí, past participle consentido)

  1. to consent
  2. to endure
  3. to pamper, indulge, spoil

ConjugationEdit

  • Rule: e becomes a ie in stressed syllables and i in certain conjugations.

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit