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See also: conspiré

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old French conspirer, from Latin conspirare, conspīrō, from con- (combining form of cum (with)) + spīrō (breathe)

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

conspire (third-person singular simple present conspires, present participle conspiring, simple past and past participle conspired)

  1. (intransitive) To secretly plot or make plans together, often with the intention to bring bad or illegal results.
    • Bible, Genesis xxxvii. 18
      They conspired against [Joseph] to slay him.
  2. (intransitive) To agree, to concur to one end.
    • Roscommon
      The press, the pulpit, and the stage / Conspire to censure and expose our age.
    • 1744, Georg Friedrich Händel, Hercules, act 3, scene 5
      I feel my vanquish'd heart conspire
      To crown a flame by Heav'n approv'd.
  3. (transitive) To try to bring about.
    • Bishop Hall
    Angry clouds conspire your overthrow.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

conspire

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of conspirar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of conspirar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of conspirar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of conspirar

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /konsˈpiɾe/, [kõnsˈpiɾe]

VerbEdit

conspire

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of conspirar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of conspirar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of conspirar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of conspirar.