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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French contrit, from Latin contrītus, perfect passive participle of conterō (grind, bruise), from con- + terō (rub, wear away).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

contrite (comparative more contrite, superlative most contrite)

  1. Sincerely penitent or feeling regret or sorrow, especially for one’s own actions; apologetic.
    • 1779, John Newton; William Cowper, Olney Hymns, London: W. Oliver, page 81:
      The Lord will happineſs divine / On contrite hearts beſtow : / Then tell me, gracious God, is mine / A contrite heart, or no ?
    • 1955, Joseph Heller, Catch-22[1], chapter 13, page 133:
      He greeted Milo jovially each time they met and, in an excess of contrite generosity, impulsively recommended Major Major for promotion. The recommendation was rejected at once at Twenty-seventh Air Force Headquarters by ex-P.F.C. Wintergreen, who scribbled a brusque, unsigned reminder that the Army had only one Major Major Major Major and did not intend to lose him by promotion just to please Colonel Cathcart.
  2. (obsolete) Thoroughly bruised or broken.

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TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

contrite (plural contrites)

  1. A contrite person; a penitent.
    • a. 1600, Richard Hooker [uncertain], “Of the Lawes of Ecclesiastical Politie”, in The Works of Mr. Richard Hooker, London: J. Best, published 1662, book VI, page 178:
      Secondly, that even where contrition or inward repentance doth cleanſe without abſolution ; the reaſon why it cometh ſo to paſs, is, becauſe ſuch contrites intend and deſire Abſolution, though they have it not.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

contrite

  1. feminine singular of contrit

ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

contrite

  1. feminine plural of contrito

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

ParticipleEdit

contrīte

  1. vocative masculine singular of contrītus