Middle EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old French corage.

NounEdit

corage (plural corages)

  1. courage
  2. heart
    • late 14th c. Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales. General Prologue: 20-22.
      In Southwerk at the Tabard as I lay
      Redy to wenden on my pilgrymage
      To Caunterbury with ful devout corage,
      In Southwark, at the Tabard, as I lay
      Ready to go on pilgrimage and start
      To Canterbury, full devout at heart,

DescendantsEdit

  • English: courage

Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *coraticum, a derivative of Latin cor (heart). Compare Old Occitan coratge.

NounEdit

corage m (oblique plural corages, nominative singular corages, nominative plural corage)

  1. courage
    • circa 1200, author unknown, Des Tresces, page 1:
      Il ot une feme de grant paraige,
      Qui avoit mit tot son coraige.
      He had a noble wife,
      Who has done all she could. (literally, had put all her courage)

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit