See also: Coram and córam

LatinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From con- + ōs.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

cōram (not comparable)

  1. in person, face to face
  2. publicly, openly
AntonymsEdit

PrepositionEdit

cōram (+ ablative)

  1. in the presence of, before
    • 405 CE, Jerome, Vulgate Exodus.20.3:
      Non habebis deos alienos coram me.
      Thou shalt have no other gods before me.

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

coram

  1. accusative singular of cora

ReferencesEdit

  • coram in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • coram in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • coram in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to praise a man to his face: aliquem coram, in os or praesentem laudare
    • to speak personally to..: coram loqui (cum aliquo)

See alsoEdit


PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

coram

  1. third-person plural (eles and elas, also used with vocês and others) present indicative of corar