CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan corda, from Latin chorda, from Ancient Greek χορδή (khordḗ, rope, cord).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

corda f (plural cordes)

  1. rope
  2. string
  3. cord
  4. (music) string instrument
  5. (geometry) chord

Derived termsEdit

ExpressionsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

corda

  1. third-person singular past historic of corder

AnagramsEdit


IrishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From English cord.

NounEdit

corda m (genitive singular corda, nominative plural cordaí)

  1. cord, string
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From English chord.

NounEdit

corda m (genitive singular corda, nominative plural cordaí)

  1. (music) chord
DeclensionEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
corda chorda gcorda
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ItalianEdit

 
Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

EtymologyEdit

From Latin chorda (cord), from Ancient Greek (Doric) χορδά (khordá), (Ionic) χορδή (khordḗ, string of gut, the string of a lyre).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

corda f (plural corde)

  1. rope
  2. (anatomy) chord, cord
  3. (music) string, cord (of a musical instrument)
  4. (geometry) chord
  5. (sports) string (of a tennis racquet, etc)
  6. (boxing) rope (of a ring)

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

corda

  1. nominative plural of cor
  2. vocative plural of cor
  3. accusative plural of cor

ReferencesEdit

  • corda in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • corda in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • corda in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly

PortugueseEdit

 
Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt
 
corda

EtymologyEdit

From Latin chorda (cord), from Ancient Greek (Doric) χορδά (khordá), (Ionic) χορδή (khordḗ, string of gut, the string of a lyre).

PronunciationEdit

 
  • IPA(key): (Brazil) /ˈkɔʁ.dɐ/, [ˈkɔɦ.dɐ]
    • IPA(key): (São Paulo) /ˈkɔɾ.dɐ/, [ˈkɔɾ.dɐ]
    • IPA(key): (Rio) /ˈkɔʁ.dɐ/, [ˈkɔʁ.dɐ]
  • IPA(key): (Portugal) /ˈkɔɾ.dɐ/, [ˈkɔɾ.ðɐ]

  • IPA(key): (South and North Brazil) /ˈkɔʁ.da/
  • IPA(key): (Interior Brazil) /ˈkɔɾ.da/
  • Hyphenation: cor‧da

NounEdit

corda f (plural cordas)

  1. rope, string
    Synonyms: fio, cabo, linha
  2. winding mechanism
  3. cord, heartstring

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Catalan corda (rope). Doublet of cuerda.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkoɾda/, [ˈkoɾ.ð̞a]

NounEdit

corda f (uncountable)

  1. rope

Usage notesEdit

Only used in the construction estar a la corda, to navigate against a headwind.

Related termsEdit