cordage

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French cordage.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cordage (countable and uncountable, plural cordages)

  1. (nautical) A set of ropes and cords, especially that used for a ship's rigging.
    • 1819, Lord Byron, Don Juan, II.13:
      So Juan stood, bewildered on the deck: / The wind sung, cordage strained, and sailors swore []
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby Dick, chapter 22
      [] as the old craft deep dived into the green seas, and sent the shivering frost all over her, and the winds howled, and the cordage rang []
    • 1974, Lawrence Durrell, Monsieur, Faber & Faber 1992, p. 151:
      A lone river wind sighed in the cordage of the ship.
  2. (obsolete) An amount of wood measured in cords.

HyponymsEdit

HolonymsEdit

  • (a set of ropes used on a ship): rigging

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

corde +‎ -age

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

cordage m (plural cordages)

  1. rope (especially, for a vessel)

Further readingEdit