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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

cordial +‎ -ity

NounEdit

cordiality (countable and uncountable, plural cordialities)

  1. The quality of being cordial.
    • 1839, Edgar Allan Poe, “The Fall of the House of Usher[1]
      Upon my entrance, Usher rose from a sofa on which he had been lying at full length, and greeted me with a vivacious warmth which had much in it, I at first thought, of an overdone cordiality—of the constrained effort of the ennuyé man of the world.
    • 1930, Evelyn Waugh, Vile Bodies, New York: Back Bay Books, 1999, Chapter V,
      Adam gave her—the spaniel, not Mrs. Florin—a gentle prod with his foot and a lump of sugar. She licked his shoe with evident cordiality. Adam was not above feeling flattered by friendliness in dogs.
  2. A friendly utterance.
    to exchange cordialities with people

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