coroner

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English coroner, from Old French curuner, from Medieval Latin custōs placitōrum corōnae (guardian of the crown's pleas). The function was originally to protect royal properties.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

coroner (plural coroners)

  1. (Commonwealth, Japan, law) A public official who presides over an inquest into unnatural deaths, and who may have (or historically had) additional powers such as investigating cases of treasure trove.
  2. (Canada, US, medicine) A medical doctor who performs autopsies and determines time and cause of death from a scientific standpoint.
  3. (Isle of Man) The administrative head of a sheading.

SynonymsEdit

HyponymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

coroner m (plural coroners)

  1. coroner (in English-speaking countries)

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

corōner

  1. first-person singular present passive subjunctive of corōnō

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French curuner; equivalent to coroune +‎ -er.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kuˈruːneːr/, /ˈkruːneːr/, /kuruˈneːr/, /ˈkurunər/

NounEdit

coroner (plural coroners)

  1. A (medieval) coroner (a royal officer who helps administer law and the courts)

DescendantsEdit

  • English: coroner (obsolete crowner)
  • Scots: crownar (obsolete)

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin corōnāre, present active infinitive of corōnō (I crown).

VerbEdit

coroner

  1. to crown (make into a monarch)

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

DescendantsEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English coroner.

NounEdit

coroner m (plural coroneri)

  1. coroner (public official)

DeclensionEdit