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EtymologyEdit

 
General Abdel Fattah el-Sisi, the sixth President of Egypt, who led a coup d’état on 3 July 2013 against the fifth President, Mohamed Morsi

coup +‎ -ist.

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NounEdit

coupist (plural coupists)

  1. One who takes part in a coup d'état.
    • [1859], Edward Vernon Harcourt, “Letter II”, in Sporting in Algeria, Hastings, East Sussex: George Lindridge, Library, 35, Robertson Street; London: Hamilton, Adams, and Co., OCLC 12244016, page 18:
      Our first stage was Cheragas; and, after passing the Trappist establishment at Staouëli, where the French fought their first battle, and Sidi-Ferruch, where they landed, we again changed horses at Douaouda. Here we deposited our fellow-coupist.
    • 1977, Edward Boorstein, Allende's Chile: An Inside View, New York, N.Y.: International Publishers Co., →ISBN, page 226:
      Besides preparing plans of attack, the coupist officers took measures to meet the problem of anti-coupism in their services.
    • 2000, H. B. Momoh, editor, The Nigerian Civil War, 1967–1970: History and Reminiscences, Ibadan, Nigeria: Sam Bookman Publishers, →ISBN, page 30:
      Either by design or default, Lieutenant Colonel Odumegwu-Ojukwu held on to 5 Infantry Battalion and refused to cooperate with the coupists, particularly in their bid to obtain money from Kano Central Bank under the pretext of settling troops salaries by intercepting the aircraft sent to Kano by [Chukwuma Kaduna] Nzeogwu for that purpose on Monday 17 January 1966.

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