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EnglishEdit

 
Diagram of an insect’s leg. The coxa is the second segment shown from the left.

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin coxa (hip).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

coxa (plural coxae)

  1. (anatomy) The basal segment of a limb of various arthropods (insects and spiders, for example).

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese [Term?], from Vulgar Latin or Late Latin coxa (thigh), from Latin coxa (hip).

NounEdit

coxa f (plural coxas)

  1. (anatomy) thigh, the upper leg

See alsoEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *koḱs-, whence also Old Irish cos (foot, leg) and Welsh coes (leg, shank).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

coxa f (genitive coxae); first declension

  1. (anatomy) hip (joint), hipbone
  2. (Medieval Latin, Vulgar Latin) thigh

DeclensionEdit

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative coxa coxae
Genitive coxae coxārum
Dative coxae coxīs
Accusative coxam coxās
Ablative coxā coxīs
Vocative coxa coxae

SynonymsEdit

  • (hip-joint of hipbone): ischion (Grecian)

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Portuguese coixa, coissa, from Vulgar Latin or Late Latin coxa (thigh), from Latin coxa (hip), from Proto-Indo-European *koḱs-.

NounEdit

coxa f (plural coxas)

  1. thigh (part of the leg above the knee)
  2. drumstick (leg of a bird eaten as food)
  3. (arthropod anatomy) coxa (basal segment of some arthropods’ limbs)
Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

coxa m, f (plural coxas)

  1. Clipping of coxa-branca.

AdjectiveEdit

coxa (invariable, comparable)

  1. Clipping of coxa-branca.

Etymology 2Edit

AdjectiveEdit

coxa

  1. Feminine singular of adjective coxo.