crapula

See also: crápula

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin crāpula (intoxication), from Ancient Greek κραιπάλη (kraipálē, intoxication, hangover).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

crapula (countable and uncountable, plural crapulas)

  1. (obsolete or literary) Sickness or indisposition caused by excessive eating or drinking.
    • 1726, Peter Shaw, A New Practice of Physic:
      If it be not of long standing, and the griping be tolerable; if the effect of crapulas; if habitual, and the patient feeds well, and suffers no considerable loss of strength; or if it be critica, and proceed from an obstructed perspiration, 'tis seldom dangerous []
    • 1794, Benjamin Rush, Medical Inquiries and Observations. Second American edition:
      Perhaps the tonic medicines which have been mentioned, render the bowels a more quiet and comfortable asylum for them, and thereby provide the system with the means of obviating the effects of crapulas, to which all children are disposed.
    • 1808, Thomas Topham, A new compendious system on several diseases incident to cattle:
      Disorders sometimes happen to young calves from difference of milk, and frequently from giving them too great a quantity; then the case becomes a crapula, and death is the consequence.
    • 1958, Anthony Burgess, The Enemy in the Blanket (The Malayan Trilogy), published 1972, page 214:
      [I]t was as much apprehension as crapula that had distracted him into admitting that the anonymous letter-writer had spoken some truth.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkra.pu.la/
  • Rhymes: -apula
  • Hyphenation: crà‧pu‧la

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Latin crāpula (excessive drinking), from Ancient Greek κραιπάλη (kraipálē).

NounEdit

crapula f (plural crapule)

  1. (literary) excessive eating and drinking; gluttony
    Synonym: gozzoviglia
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

VerbEdit

crapula

  1. third-person singular present indicative of crapulare

ReferencesEdit

  • crapula in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Ancient Greek κραιπάλη (kraipálē, intoxication, hangover)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

crāpula f (genitive crāpulae); first declension

  1. excessive drinking, drunkenness, inebriation, intoxication

DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative crāpula crāpulae
Genitive crāpulae crāpulārum
Dative crāpulae crāpulīs
Accusative crāpulam crāpulās
Ablative crāpulā crāpulīs
Vocative crāpula crāpulae

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit