English

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Etymology

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From Middle English cryminal, borrowed from Anglo-Norman criminal, from Late Latin criminalis, from Latin crimen (crime).

Pronunciation

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Adjective

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criminal (comparative more criminal, superlative most criminal)

  1. Against the law; forbidden by law.
  2. Guilty of breaking the law.
    • a. 1729, John Rogers, The Difficulties of Obtaining Salvation:
      The neglect of any of the relative duties renders us criminal in the sight of God.
  3. Of or relating to crime or penal law.
    His long criminal record suggests that he is a dangerous man.
    • 1827, Henry Hallam, The Constitutional History of England from the Accession of Henry VII. to the Death of George II. [], volumes (please specify |volume=I or II), London: John Murray, [], →OCLC:
      The officers and servants of the crown, violating the personal liberty, or other right of the subject [] in some cases, were liable to criminal process.
  4. (figuratively) Abhorrent or very undesirable.
    Printing such asinine opinions is criminal!
    • 2020 May 6, Graeme Pickering, “Borders Railway: time for the next step”, in Rail, page 54:
      [...] I think it represents exceptional value for money and I think it would be criminal not to go ahead and build it."

Synonyms

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Derived terms

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Collocations

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Translations

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The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Noun

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criminal (plural criminals)

  1. A person who is guilty of a crime, notably breaking the law.
    Synonyms: lawbreaker, offender, perpetrator
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 3, in The China Governess: A Mystery, London: Chatto & Windus, →OCLC:
      []  There's every Staffordshire crime-piece ever made in this cabinet, and that's unique. The Van Hoyer Museum in New York hasn't that very rare second version of Maria Marten's Red Barn over there, nor the little Frederick George Manning—he was the criminal Dickens saw hanged on the roof of the gaol in Horsemonger Lane, by the way—’

Synonyms

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Hypernyms

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Derived terms

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Compound words and expressions

Translations

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Catalan

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Latin criminālis.

Pronunciation

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Adjective

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criminal m or f (masculine and feminine plural criminals)

  1. criminal (against the law)
  2. criminal (guilty of breaking the law)
  3. criminal (of or relating to crime)

Derived terms

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Noun

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criminal m or f by sense (plural criminals)

  1. criminal (a person who is guilty of a crime)
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Further reading

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Galician

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Etymology

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(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /kɾimiˈnal/ [kɾi.mĩˈnɑɫ]
  • Rhymes: -al

Adjective

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criminal m or f (plural criminais)

  1. criminal (that constitutes a crime)
    Synonym: criminoso
  2. criminal (relating or pertaining to crimes)
    Synonym: criminoso
  3. (colloquial) that can be very bad in its class or that can be harmful

Noun

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criminal m or f by sense (plural criminais)

  1. criminal (a person who has committed a crime)
    Synonym: asasino

Further reading

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Occitan

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Alternative forms

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Pronunciation

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  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

Adjective

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criminal m (feminine singular criminala, masculine plural criminals, feminine plural criminalas) (Languedoc)

  1. criminal

Further reading

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Old French

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Late Latin or Juridical Latin criminālis, from Latin crīmen.

Adjective

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criminal m (oblique and nominative feminine singular criminale)

  1. criminal; illegal; against the law

Declension

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Portuguese

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Late Latin or Juridical Latin criminālis (criminal), from Latin crīmen (verdict; crime).

Pronunciation

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  • Rhymes: (Portugal) -al, (Brazil) -aw
  • Hyphenation: cri‧mi‧nal

Adjective

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criminal m or f (plural criminais, not comparable)

  1. (law) criminal (of or relating to crime or penal law)
    Antecedente criminal.
    Criminal record.

Derived terms

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Further reading

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Romanian

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Etymology

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Borrowed from French criminel, Late Latin criminalis, from Latin crimen.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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criminal m (plural criminali, feminine equivalent criminală)

  1. criminal, felon, perpetrator, offender, lawbreaker
  2. murderer, slayer
  3. cutthroat, thug

Declension

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Adjective

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criminal m or n (feminine singular criminală, masculine plural criminali, feminine and neuter plural criminale)

  1. criminal, felonious, lawbreaking
  2. murderous, homicidal
  3. cutthroat

Declension

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Adverb

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criminal

  1. criminally
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Further reading

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Spanish

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Late Latin or Juridical Latin criminālis (criminal), from Latin crīmen (verdict; crime).

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /kɾimiˈnal/ [kɾi.miˈnal]
  • Rhymes: -al
  • Syllabification: cri‧mi‧nal

Adjective

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criminal m or f (masculine and feminine plural criminales)

  1. criminal
    Synonym: criminoso

Derived terms

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Noun

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criminal m or f by sense (plural criminales)

  1. criminal

Derived terms

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Further reading

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