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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin

NounEdit

custos (plural custodes)

  1. (obsolete) A warden.
    • c. 1530, John Rastell, The Pastyme of People: The Cronycles of Dyuers Realmys, London,[1]
      [] they were commytted to prison & put out of theyr offyces & the Constable of the Towre made custos of the citye.
    • 1803, Robert Charles Dallas, The History of the Maroons, London: Longman and Rees, Volume 1, Letter 5, p. 148,[2]
      Mr. Tharp, the Custos of the parish, and several other gentlement, accompanied the corps.
  2. (Roman Catholicism) A monastic superior, who, under the general of his order, has the direction of all the religious houses of the same fraternity in a given district, called a custody of the order.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Possibly from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kewdʰ- (to cover, wrap, encase), from *(s)kew- (to cover, hide), in which case cognate with Ancient Greek κεύθω (keúthō, to conceal), Old English hȳdan (to hide, conceal, preserve) (English hide).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cū̆stōs m (genitive cū̆stōdis); third declension

  1. A guard, protector
  2. A guardian, tutor
  3. A jailer
  4. A keeper, custodian

NotesEdit

Root vowel length uncertain due to unclear etymology, lack of inscriptional evidence and conflicting evidence from Romance languages. Greek Κουστώδης suggests a long vowel, though.

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative cū̆stōs cū̆stōdēs
Genitive cū̆stōdis cū̆stōdum
Dative cū̆stōdī cū̆stōdibus
Accusative cū̆stōdem cū̆stōdēs
Ablative cū̆stōde cū̆stōdibus
Vocative cū̆stōs cū̆stōdēs

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

custos

  1. plural of custo