Open main menu

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈdælɪ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈdæli/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æli

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English dalyen, from Anglo-Norman delaier

VerbEdit

dally (third-person singular simple present dallies, present participle dallying, simple past and past participle dallied)

  1. To waste time in trivial activities, or in idleness; to trifle.
    • a. 1726, Benjamin Calamy, in Sermons preached upon several occasions, edited by J. Calamy
      [] we have trifled too long already about a matter of such infinite moment, it is perfect Madness to dally any longer. []
    • a. 1692, Isaac Barrow, "The Danger and Mischief of Delaying Repentance"
      [] after we by our presumptuous delays have put off God, and dallied with his grace; []
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To caress, especially of a sexual nature; to fondle or pet
  3. To delay unnecessarily; to while away.
  4. To wind the lasso rope (ie throw-rope) around the saddle horn (the saddle horn is attached to the pommel of a western style saddle) after the roping of an animal
    • 2003, Jameson Parker, An Accidental Cowboy, page 89:
      The end of the top rope he dallied around the gooseneck trailer hitch.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Possibly from Spanish "dale la vuelta !" ("twist it around !") by law of Hobson-Jobson.

NounEdit

dally (plural dallies)

  1. Several wraps of rope around the saddle horn, used to stop animals in roping.
    • 1947 - Bruce Kiskaddon, Rhymes and Ranches
      What matters is now if he tied hard and fast, / Or tumbled his steer with a dally.

AnagramsEdit