See also: Dean, déan, deán, and dèan

EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English den, deen (dean), from Anglo-Norman deen and continental Old French deien (modern French doyen), from Latin decānus. Doublet of doyen.

NounEdit

dean (plural deans)

  1. A senior official in a college or university, who may be in charge of a division or faculty (for example, the dean of science) or have some other advisory or disciplinary function (for example, the dean of students).
    • 1995 October 1, Robert Frost, Richard Poirier, Robert Frost: Collected Poems, Prose, & Plays (LOA #81) (DE-601)374069697: Library of America series)‎[1], Library of America, →ISBN, LCCN 94043693, OCLC 1003677810, page 357:
      Lucretius versus the Lake Poets ' Nature I loved ; and next to Nature , Art . '
      Dean , adult education may seem silly .
      What of it though ? I got some willy - nilly
      The other evening at your college deanery .
      And grateful for it ( Let's not be facetious!) []
  2. A dignitary or presiding officer in certain church bodies, especially an ecclesiastical dignitary, subordinate to a bishop, in charge of a chapter of canons.
  3. The senior member of some group of people.
    dean of the diplomatic corps - a country's most senior ambassador
    dean of the House - the longest-serving member of a legislature
    • 1955, Rex Stout, "The Next Witness", in Three Witnesses, October 1994 Bantam edition, →ISBN, page 67:
      All of the switchboard operators had been parties to it, including Marie Willis. Their dean, Alice Hart, collected []
SynonymsEdit
  • (Head of cathedral chapter): provost
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

dean (third-person singular simple present deans, present participle deaning, simple past and past participle deaned)

  1. (intransitive, rare) To serve as a dean.
  2. (transitive, Oxbridge, otherwise rare, informal) To send (a student) to see the dean of a college or university.

Etymology 2Edit

Related to den.

NounEdit

dean (plural deans)

  1. (Sussex, chiefly in place names) A hill.

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

dean (plural deans)

  1. (Northumbria, chiefly in place names) Alternative form of dene.

AnagramsEdit


BasqueEdit

NounEdit

dean

  1. inessive singular of de

FriulianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin decānus, from Latin decem (ten). Compare Italian decano, Venetian degàn, French doyen.

NounEdit

dean m (plural deans)

  1. (religion) dean
  2. doyen

Related termsEdit


GalicianEdit

VerbEdit

dean

  1. third-person plural present subjunctive of dar