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See also: Dean, déan, deán, and dèan

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Anglo-Norman deen, from Old French deien, from Latin decānus.

NounEdit

dean (plural deans)

  1. A senior official in a college or university, who may be in charge of a division or faculty (for example, the dean of science) or have some other advisory or disciplinary function (for example, the dean of students).
  2. A dignitary or presiding officer in certain church bodies, especially an ecclesiastical dignitary, subordinate to a bishop, in charge of a chapter of canons.
  3. The senior member of some group of people.
    dean of the diplomatic corps - a country's most senior ambassador
    dean of the House - the longest-serving member of a legislature
    • 1955, Rex Stout, "The Next Witness", in Three Witnesses, October 1994 Bantam edition, →ISBN, page 67:
      All of the switchboard operators had been parties to it, including Marie Willis. Their dean, Alice Hart, collected []
SynonymsEdit
  • (Head of cathedral chapter): provost
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

dean (third-person singular simple present deans, present participle deaning, simple past and past participle deaned)

  1. (intransitive, rare) To serve as a dean.
  2. (transitive, rare, informal) To send (a student) to see the dean of a university.

Etymology 2Edit

Related to den.

NounEdit

dean (plural deans)

  1. (Sussex, chiefly in place names) A hill.

AnagramsEdit


FriulianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin decānus, from Latin decem (ten). Compare Italian decano, Venetian degàn, French doyen.

NounEdit

dean m (plural deans)

  1. (religion) dean
  2. doyen

Related termsEdit


GalicianEdit