EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch de +‎ kooi, literally "the cage". Possibly related to verb coy (which itself may have been influenced by decoy).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈdiːkɔɪ/
  • (file)

NounEdit

decoy (plural decoys)

  1. A person or object meant to lure somebody into danger.
  2. A real or fake animal used by hunters to lure game.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

decoy (third-person singular simple present decoys, present participle decoying, simple past and past participle decoyed)

  1. (transitive) To lead into danger by artifice; to lure into a net or snare; to entrap.
    to decoy troops into an ambush; to decoy ducks into a net
    • (Can we date this quote by Goldsmith and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      E'en while fashion's brightest arts decoy, / The heart, distrusting, asks if this be joy.
  2. (intransitive) To act as, or use, a decoy. (Can we add an example for this sense?)

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