See also: Dent

EnglishEdit

 
A dented shield.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK, US) enPR: dĕnt, IPA(key): /dɛnt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛnt

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English dent, dente, dint (a blow; strike; dent), from Old English dynt (blow, strike, the mark or noise of a blow), from Proto-Germanic *duntiz (a blow). Akin to Old Norse dyntr (dint). More at dint.

NounEdit

dent (plural dents)

  1. A shallow deformation in the surface of an object, produced by an impact.
    The crash produced a dent in the left side of the car.
  2. A type of maize/corn with a relatively soft outer hull, and a soft type of starch that shrinks at maturity to leave an indentation in the surface of the kernel.
  3. (by extension, informal) A sudden negative change, such as loss, damage, weakening, consumption or diminution, especially one produced by an external force, event or action
    That purchase put a bit of a dent in my wallet.
    • 2011 April 11, Phil McNulty, “Liverpool 3 - 0 Man City”, in BBC Sport[1]:
      Andy Carroll's first goals since his £35m move to Liverpool put a dent in Manchester City's Champions League hopes as they were emphatically swept aside at Anfield.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

dent (third-person singular simple present dents, present participle denting, simple past and past participle dented)

  1. (transitive) To impact something, producing a dent.
  2. (intransitive) To develop a dent or dents.
    Copper is soft and dents easily.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

French, from Latin dens, dentis, tooth. Doublet of tooth.

NounEdit

dent (plural dents)

  1. (engineering) A tooth, as of a card, a gear wheel, etc.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  2. (weaving) A slot or a wire in a reed

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

With change of gender from Latin dentem, accusative of dēns m.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dent f (plural dents)

  1. (anatomy) tooth
  2. tooth (saw tooth)
  3. tooth (gear tooth)

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


Franco-ProvençalEdit

NounEdit

dent m

  1. tooth

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French dent, with change of gender from Old French dent m, from Latin dentem, accusative of dēns, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₃dénts, *h₃dónts.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dent f (plural dents)

  1. tooth
  2. cog (tooth on a gear)

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

dent

  1. third-person plural present active subjunctive of , "they may give"

LombardEdit

EtymologyEdit

Akin to dente, from Latin dens.

NounEdit

dent ?

  1. tooth

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

dent

  1. Alternative form of dint

Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French dent.

NounEdit

dent f (plural dens)

  1. tooth

DescendantsEdit

  • French: dent

NormanEdit

 
Norman Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nrm

EtymologyEdit

From Old French dent, from Latin dēns, dentem, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃dénts, *h₃dónts.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

dent m (plural dents)

  1. (anatomy) tooth

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dentem, accusative of dēns. Attested from the 12th century.[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

dent f (plural dents)

  1. tooth

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Diccionari General de la Lenga Occitana, L’Academia occitana – Consistòri del Gai Saber, 2008-2016, page 185.

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dēns, dente

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dent m (oblique plural denz or dentz, nominative singular denz or dentz, nominative plural dent)

  1. (anatomy, of a comb) tooth

DescendantsEdit


PiedmonteseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dēns, dentem, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃dénts, *h₃dónts.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dent m (plural dent)

  1. tooth

Derived termsEdit


RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (Sutsilvan, Surmiran, Puter, Vallader) daint

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dēns, dentem, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃dénts, *h₃dónts.

NounEdit

dent m (plural dents)

  1. (anatomy, Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan) tooth

Derived termsEdit