See also: Dent

EnglishEdit

 
A dented shield.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK, US) enPR: dĕnt, IPA(key): /dɛnt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛnt

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English dent, dente, dint (a blow; strike; dent), from Old English dynt (blow, strike, the mark or noise of a blow), from Proto-Germanic *duntiz (a blow). Akin to Old Norse dyntr (dint). More at dint.

NounEdit

dent (plural dents)

  1. A shallow deformation in the surface of an object, produced by an impact.
    The crash produced a dent in the left side of the car.
  2. A type of maize/corn with a relatively soft outer hull, and a soft type of starch that shrinks at maturity to leave an indentation in the surface of the kernel.
  3. (by extension, informal) A sudden negative change, such as loss, damage, weakening, consumption or diminution, especially one produced by an external force, event or action
    That purchase put a bit of a dent in my wallet.
    • 2011 April 11, Phil McNulty, “Liverpool 3 - 0 Man City”, in BBC Sport[1]:
      Andy Carroll's first goals since his £35m move to Liverpool put a dent in Manchester City's Champions League hopes as they were emphatically swept aside at Anfield.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

dent (third-person singular simple present dents, present participle denting, simple past and past participle dented)

  1. (transitive) To impact something, producing a dent.
  2. (intransitive) To develop a dent or dents.
    Copper is soft and dents easily.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

French, from Latin dens, dentis, tooth. Doublet of tooth.

NounEdit

dent (plural dents)

  1. (engineering) A tooth, as of a card, a gear wheel, etc.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  2. (weaving) A slot or a wire in a reed

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dentem, accusative of dēns.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dent f (plural dents)

  1. (anatomy) tooth
  2. tooth (saw tooth)
  3. tooth (gear tooth)

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French dent, from Old French dent, from Latin dentem, accusative of dēns, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₃dénts, *h₃dónts.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dent f (plural dents)

  1. tooth
  2. cog (tooth on a gear)

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

dent

  1. third-person plural present active subjunctive of , "they may lead"

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

dent

  1. Alternative form of dint

Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French dent.

NounEdit

dent f (plural dens)

  1. tooth

DescendantsEdit

  • French: dent

NormanEdit

 
Norman Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nrm

EtymologyEdit

From Old French dent, from Latin dēns, dentem, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃dénts, *h₃dónts.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

dent m (plural dents)

  1. (anatomy) tooth

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dentem, accusative of dēns. Attested from the 12th century.[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

dent f (plural dents)

  1. tooth

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Diccionari General de la Lenga Occitana, L’Academia occitana – Consistòri del Gai Saber, 2008-2016, page 185.

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dēns, dente

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dent m (oblique plural denz or dentz, nominative singular denz or dentz, nominative plural dent)

  1. (anatomy, of a comb) tooth

PiedmonteseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dēns, dentem, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃dénts, *h₃dónts.

NounEdit

dent m (plural dent)

  1. tooth

RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (Sutsilvan, Surmiran, Puter, Vallader) daint

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dēns, dentem, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃dénts, *h₃dónts.

NounEdit

dent m (plural dents)

  1. (anatomy, Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan) tooth

Derived termsEdit