English edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /dɪs/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪs

Etymology 1 edit

Abbreviation of disrespect.

Verb edit

dis (third-person singular simple present disses, present participle dissing, simple past and past participle dissed)

  1. (informal) Alternative spelling of diss
Translations edit

Noun edit

dis (plural disses)

  1. Alternative form of diss
Translations edit

Etymology 2 edit

Learned borrowing from Old Norse dís.

Noun edit

dis (plural disir)

  1. (Norse mythology) Any of a group of minor female deities in Scandinavian folklore.
    • 1851, Benjamin Thorpe, Northern Mythology, E Lumley, page 116:
      In Norway the Dîsir appear to have been held in great veneration.
    • 1993, Hilda Ellis Davidson, The Lost Beliefs of Northern Europe, Routledge, page 113:
      A number of places in Norway and Sweden were also named after the Disir
    • 1997, ‘Egil's Saga’, translated by Bernard Scudder, The Sagas of Icelanders, Penguin, published 2001, page 67:
      Bard had prepared a feast for him, because a sacrifice was being made to the disir.

Etymology 3 edit

Representing a colloquial or dialectal pronunciation with th-stopping of this.

Alternative forms edit

Determiner edit

dis

  1. (slang or pronunciation spelling) This.

Pronoun edit

dis

  1. (slang or pronunciation spelling) This.

See also edit

Anagrams edit

Afrikaans edit

Alternative forms edit

  • 'is (Cape Afrikaans)

Pronunciation edit

Contraction edit

dis

  1. Contraction of dit is (this's, that's, it's)

Derived terms edit

Cimbrian edit

Pronoun edit

dis

  1. (Sette Comuni) Alternative form of ditzan

References edit

  • “dis” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

Danish edit

Etymology edit

From Low German dis.

Noun edit

dis

  1. (light) mist or haze

Verb edit

dis

  1. imperative of disse

Dutch edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Middle Dutch disch, from Old Dutch disk, from Proto-Germanic *diskuz (table; dish; bowl), from Latin discus. Cognate with English dish and German Tisch (table).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

dis m (plural dissen, diminutive disje n)

  1. (dated) table
    Synonyms: tafel, berd
  2. (rare) meal, dish

Derived terms edit

Finnish edit

Etymology edit

From German Dis (German key notation).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈdis/, [ˈdis̠]
  • Rhymes: -is
  • Syllabification(key): dis

Noun edit

dis

  1. (music) D-sharp

Usage notes edit

Capitalized for the great octave or any octave below that, or in names of major keys; not capitalized for the small octave or any octave above that, or in names of minor keys.

Declension edit

Inflection of dis (Kotus type 5/risti, no gradation)
nominative dis disit
genitive disin disien
partitive disiä disejä
illative disiin diseihin
singular plural
nominative dis disit
accusative nom. dis disit
gen. disin
genitive disin disien
partitive disiä disejä
inessive disissä diseissä
elative disistä diseistä
illative disiin diseihin
adessive disillä diseillä
ablative disiltä diseiltä
allative disille diseille
essive disinä diseinä
translative disiksi diseiksi
abessive disittä diseittä
instructive disein
comitative See the possessive forms below.
Possessive forms of dis (Kotus type 5/risti, no gradation)
first-person singular possessor
singular plural
nominative disini disini
accusative nom. disini disini
gen. disini
genitive disini disieni
partitive disiäni disejäni
inessive disissäni diseissäni
elative disistäni diseistäni
illative disiini diseihini
adessive disilläni diseilläni
ablative disiltäni diseiltäni
allative disilleni diseilleni
essive disinäni diseinäni
translative disikseni diseikseni
abessive disittäni diseittäni
instructive
comitative diseineni
second-person singular possessor
singular plural
nominative disisi disisi
accusative nom. disisi disisi
gen. disisi
genitive disisi disiesi
partitive disiäsi disejäsi
inessive disissäsi diseissäsi
elative disistäsi diseistäsi
illative disiisi diseihisi
adessive disilläsi diseilläsi
ablative disiltäsi diseiltäsi
allative disillesi diseillesi
essive disinäsi diseinäsi
translative disiksesi diseiksesi
abessive disittäsi diseittäsi
instructive
comitative diseinesi
first-person plural possessor
singular plural
nominative disimme disimme
accusative nom. disimme disimme
gen. disimme
genitive disimme disiemme
partitive disiämme disejämme
inessive disissämme diseissämme
elative disistämme diseistämme
illative disiimme diseihimme
adessive disillämme diseillämme
ablative disiltämme diseiltämme
allative disillemme diseillemme
essive disinämme diseinämme
translative disiksemme diseiksemme
abessive disittämme diseittämme
instructive
comitative diseinemme
second-person plural possessor
singular plural
nominative disinne disinne
accusative nom. disinne disinne
gen. disinne
genitive disinne disienne
partitive disiänne disejänne
inessive disissänne diseissänne
elative disistänne diseistänne
illative disiinne diseihinne
adessive disillänne diseillänne
ablative disiltänne diseiltänne
allative disillenne diseillenne
essive disinänne diseinänne
translative disiksenne diseiksenne
abessive disittänne diseittänne
instructive
comitative diseinenne
third-person possessor
singular plural
nominative disinsä disinsä
accusative nom. disinsä disinsä
gen. disinsä
genitive disinsä disiensä
partitive disiään
disiänsä
disejään
disejänsä
inessive disissään
disissänsä
diseissään
diseissänsä
elative disistään
disistänsä
diseistään
diseistänsä
illative disiinsä diseihinsä
adessive disillään
disillänsä
diseillään
diseillänsä
ablative disiltään
disiltänsä
diseiltään
diseiltänsä
allative disilleen
disillensä
diseilleen
diseillensä
essive disinään
disinänsä
diseinään
diseinänsä
translative disikseen
disiksensä
diseikseen
diseiksensä
abessive disittään
disittänsä
diseittään
diseittänsä
instructive
comitative diseineen
diseinensä

Derived terms edit

compounds

French edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

dis

  1. inflection of dire:
    1. first/second-person singular present indicative
    2. first/second-person singular past historic
    3. second-person singular imperative

Galician edit

Verb edit

dis

  1. second-person singular present indicative of dicir
  2. (reintegrationist norm) second-person singular present indicative of dizer

German edit

Pronoun edit

dis

  1. Obsolete spelling of dies

Haitian Creole edit

Etymology edit

From French dix.

Pronunciation edit

Numeral edit

dis

  1. ten

Ladin edit

Noun edit

dis

  1. plural of

Latin edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Contracted form of dīves.

Adjective edit

dīs (genitive dītis, comparative dītior, superlative dītissimus); third-declension one-termination adjective

  1. rich, wealthy
    Synonyms: opulentus, opulens, dives, ditis, locuples
    Antonyms: pauper, egens, inops, exiguus
Declension edit

Third-declension one-termination adjective.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masc./Fem. Neuter Masc./Fem. Neuter
Nominative dīs dītēs dītia
Genitive dītis dītium
Dative dītī dītibus
Accusative dītem dīs dītēs dītia
Ablative dītī dītibus
Vocative dīs dītēs dītia
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Inflected form of deus (god).

Noun edit

dīs

  1. dative/ablative plural of deus

References edit

  • dis”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • dis”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • dis in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) to give thanks to heaven: grates agere (dis immortalibus)
    • (ambiguous) to thank, glorify the immortal gods: grates, laudes agere dis immortalibus
    • (ambiguous) with the help of the gods: dis bene iuvantibus (Fam. 7. 20. 2)
    • (ambiguous) to sacrifice: rem divinam facere (dis)
  • dis”, in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray

Louisiana Creole edit

Louisiana Creole cardinal numbers
 <  9 10 11  > 
    Cardinal : dis

Etymology edit

Inherited from French dix (ten).

Pronunciation edit

Numeral edit

dis

  1. ten

Usage notes edit

  • This word is used independently of nouns.
  • When preceding nouns, di is used for consonant-initial words, and diz is used for vowel-initial words. Compare French etymon dix.

Related terms edit

Mauritian Creole edit

Mauritian Creole cardinal numbers
 <  9 10 11  > 
    Cardinal : dis
    Ordinal : diziem

Etymology edit

From French dix.

Numeral edit

dis

  1. ten

Middle Dutch edit

Determiner edit

dis

  1. neuter genitive singular of dese

Middle English edit

Etymology 1 edit

Determiner edit

dis

  1. Alternative form of þis

Etymology 2 edit

Noun edit

dis (plural dis or dises)

  1. Alternative form of dees (die)

Noun edit

dis

  1. Alternative form of dees: plural of dee (die)

Nigerian Pidgin edit

Etymology edit

From English this.

Determiner edit

dis

  1. this

Norman edit

Verb edit

dis

  1. first-person singular preterite of dithe

Northern Sami edit

Pronunciation edit

  • (Kautokeino) IPA(key): /ˈtiːs/

Pronoun edit

dīs

  1. locative of dii

Norwegian Bokmål edit

Etymology edit

From German Low German dis.

Noun edit

dis m (definite singular disen)

  1. haze

Related terms edit

References edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Etymology 1 edit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

From German Low German dis.

Noun edit

dis m (definite singular disen, uncountable)

  1. haze
Related terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

From Old Norse dís f, form Proto-Germanic *dīsiz ((demi-)goddess; virgin)

Noun edit

dis f (definite singular disa, indefinite plural diser, definite plural disene)

  1. (Norse mythology) dis

Etymology 3 edit

From De (you (formal singular)) modelled after the adjective dus.

Adjective edit

dis (singular and plural dis)

  1. having formal distance (of interpersonal relationships)
  2. (originally historically, formal) being on terms where one may address each other with the formal 2nd person singular pronoun De, as opposed to the more formal du.
Antonyms edit

References edit

Old French edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Latin decem.

Pronunciation edit

Numeral edit

cardinal number
10 Previous: nuef
Next: onze

dis

  1. ten
Descendants edit
  • French: dix
  • Norman: dgix, dix; dyis
  • Walloon: dijh

Etymology 2 edit

From the verb dire.

Verb edit

dis

  1. inflection of dire:
    1. first/second-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular present imperative

Polish edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

dis n (indeclinable)

  1. (music) D sharp

Further reading edit

  • dis in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Swedish edit

Etymology edit

From Low German dis (haze), of West Germanic origin (compare Dutch dijs (mist, fog), West Frisian diish), of uncertain origin; possibly from Middle Low German dûnster, from Old Saxon *thinstar, from Proto-West Germanic *þimstr (dusky, dark). If so, related to modern Dutch deemster (twilight).[1]

Noun edit

dis n (uncountable)

  1. mist, haze; a thin fog
  2. indefinite genitive singular of di

Declension edit

Declension of dis 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative dis diset
Genitive dis disets

Synonyms edit

Related terms edit

References edit

  1. ^ disa”, in Svenska Akademiens ordbok [Dictionary of the Swedish Academy][1] (in Swedish), 1937

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Tok Pisin edit

Etymology edit

From English dish.

Noun edit

dis

  1. dish; bowl

Volapük edit

Preposition edit

dis

  1. under

Welsh edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English dees.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

dis m or f (plural disiau or disau)

  1. die (polyhedron used in games of chance)

Mutation edit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
dis ddis nis unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.