disable

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

dis- +‎ able

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): [dɪsˈeɪbəɫ]
  • Rhymes: -eɪbəl
  • (file)

VerbEdit

disable (third-person singular simple present disables, present participle disabling, simple past and past participle disabled)

  1. (transitive) To render unable; to take away an ability of, as by crippling.
  2. (chiefly of a person) To impair the physical or mental abilities of; to cause a serious, permanent injury.
    Falling off the horse disabled him.
  3. (chiefly electronics, computing) To deactivate, to make inoperational (especially of a function of an electronic or mechanical device).
    The pilot had to disable the autopilot of his airplane.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

disable (comparative more disable, superlative most disable)

  1. (obsolete) Lacking ability; unable.
    • 1595, Samuel Daniel, “(please specify the folio number)”, in The First Fowre Bookes of the Ciuile Wars between the Two Houses of Lancaster and Yorke, London: [] P[eter] Short for Simon Waterson, OCLC 28470143:
      Our disable and unactive force.

AnagramsEdit


ScotsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈdɪsebl/, /ˈdɪʃebl/

VerbEdit

disable (third-person singular present disables, present participle disablein, past disablet, past participle disablet)

  1. disable, disqualify