discolor

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French descolorer, des- + colorer

VerbEdit

discolor (third-person singular simple present discolors, present participle discoloring, simple past and past participle discolored)

  1. (American spelling) To change or lose color.
    Washing light laundry with dark may cause your clothes to discolor.
    A bad enough bruise can discolor the skin.

TranslationsEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

discolor (genitive discolōris); third-declension one-termination adjective

  1. having a different colour
  2. variegated

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension one-termination adjective.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masc./Fem. Neuter Masc./Fem. Neuter
Nominative discolor discolōrēs discolōria
Genitive discolōris discolōrium
Dative discolōrī discolōribus
Accusative discolōrem discolor discolōrēs discolōria
Ablative discolōrī discolōribus
Vocative discolor discolōrēs discolōria

ReferencesEdit

  • discolor in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • discolor in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • discolor in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • discolor in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette