English

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Pronunciation

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Verb

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disguised

  1. simple past and past participle of disguise

Adjective

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disguised (comparative more disguised, superlative most disguised)

  1. Wearing a disguise; dressed in strange or unusual clothes, or taking on a changed appearance, especially to conceal one’s identity.
  2. (of things) Made to appear as something other than it is, hidden in outward form.
  3. (obsolete, of dress) Altered for the sake of fashion; newfangled or showy.
  4. (obsolete, of dress, names, etc.) Serving as a disguise; altered for the sake of concealing one’s identity.
    under a disguised name
  5. (obsolete) Concealed, hidden, out of sight.
  6. (obsolete) Acting inappropriately, badly behaved.
    • c. 1503–1512, John Skelton, Ware the Hauke; republished in John Scattergood, editor, John Skelton: The Complete English Poems, 1983, →OCLC, page 62, lines 20–23:
      Therefore to make complaynt
      Of such mysadvysed
      Parsons and dysgysed,
      Thys boke we have devysed, []
    • 1521–1522, John Skelton, Collyn Clout; republished in John Scattergood, editor, John Skelton: The Complete English Poems, 1983, →OCLC, page 261, lines 574–576, 579–580:
      And thus the loselles stryves,
      And lewdely sayes by Chryst
      Agaynst the sely preest. []
      They mought be better advysed
      Then to be so dysgysed.
  7. (slang, obsolete, by extension) Drunk.
    • 1748, [Samuel Richardson], chapter 4, in Clarissa. Or, The History of a Young Lady: [], volume I, London: [] S[amuel] Richardson;  [], →OCLC:
      He was never known to be disguised with liquor […].
    • c. 1600, Thomas Deloney, Strange histories, or, Songs and sonnets:
      The saylers and the shipmen all, / Through foul excesse of wine, / Were so disguised that at the sea / They shew'd themselves like swine.

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