See also: diss.

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

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Etymology 1Edit

Originated in Jamaican Vernacular English or African American Vernacular English, probably originally a clipping of disrespect or disparage.

VerbEdit

diss ‎(third-person singular simple present disses, present participle dissing, simple past and past participle dissed)

  1. (US, Britain, slang) To put (someone) down, or show disrespect by the use of insulting language or dismissive behaviour.
    • 1905, 10 December, The Sunday Times (Perth), "A New Word", page 4:
      When a journalistic rival tries to "dis" you
      And to prejudice you in the public's eyes.
      Don't stigmatise his charges as a "tissue
      Of palpable, unmitigated lies."
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

diss ‎(plural disses)

  1. (slang) An insult or put-down; an expression of disrespect.
TranslationsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Clipping of dissertation

AbbreviationEdit

diss

  1. dissertation
    • 2012 April 5, shkbop9190, “Failing a Dissertation”, in The Student Room Forums[1], retrieved 2016-12-01:
      I've been wondering what happens if I fail my diss. I know i'm allowed to fail 60 credits but I don't think that includes the diss.

AnagramsEdit


SwedishEdit

NounEdit

diss c

  1. (slang) diss, rejection

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of diss 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative diss dissen dissar dissarna
Genitive diss dissens dissars dissarnas