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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English, merger of distract (distracted) and straught (distraught), past participle of strecchen (to stretch). Compare also bestraught, extraught, forstraught, etc. More at distract, stretch.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

distraught (comparative more distraught, superlative most distraught)

  1. Deeply hurt, saddened, or worried; distressed.
    His distraught widow cried for days, feeling very alone.
    • 2018 May 26, Daniel Taylor, “Liverpool go through after Mohamed Salah stops Manchester City fightback”, in The Guardian (London)[1]:
      {{..}}Karius was a danger to his own team, responsible for Madrid’s two other goals and last seen wandering aimlessly around the pitch – alone, distraught and clearly traumatised – to ask forgiveness, hands clasped, from the thousands of Liverpool supporters.

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