EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Afrikaans dof. Doublet of dowf.

AdjectiveEdit

dof (comparative more dof, superlative most dof)

  1. (South Africa) Stupid; thick.

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /dɔf/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: dof
  • Rhymes: -ɔf

EtymologyEdit

Vowel shortening of doof, from Middle Dutch dôof, from Old Dutch *dōf, from Proto-West Germanic *daub, from Proto-Germanic *daubaz (stunned, deaf), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰewbʰ- (to whisk, be obscured). Compare Swedish dov (matt, muted), English dowf

AdjectiveEdit

dof (comparative doffer, superlative dofst)

  1. (surface) dull, matte
  2. (sound) dull, muffled
  3. languid, apathetic
    Synonyms: loom, lui, flauw, mat
InflectionEdit
Inflection of dof
uninflected dof
inflected doffe
comparative doffer
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial dof doffer het dofst
het dofste
indefinite m./f. sing. doffe doffere dofste
n. sing. dof doffer dofste
plural doffe doffere dofste
definite doffe doffere dofste
partitive dofs doffers

NounEdit

dof m (plural doffen, diminutive dofje n)

  1. A dull impact; a slam, a pound, a blow.
Derived termsEdit

WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Indo-European *demh₂-. Cognate with English tame.

AdjectiveEdit

dof (feminine singular dof, plural dofion, equative dofed, comparative dofach, superlative dofaf)

  1. tame
    Antonym: gwyllt
  2. cultivated (of plants etc.)
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Inflected form of dod (to come).

VerbEdit

dof

  1. (literary) first-person singular present/future of dod
Alternative formsEdit
  • da (colloquial)
  • deuaf (literary)
  • do (colloquial)

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
dof ddof nof unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.