drudgery

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

drudge +‎ -ery

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈdɹʌdʒəɹi/
  • (file)

NounEdit

drudgery (countable and uncountable, plural drudgeries)

  1. Tedious, menial, and exhausting work.
    • 1748 David Hume Enquiries concerning the human understanding and concerning the principles of moral. London: Oxford University Press, 1973 § 34
      we are, perhaps, all the while flattering our natural indolence, which, hating the bustle of the world, and drudgery of business seeks a pretence of reason to give itself a full and uncontrolled indulgence.
    • 2018 December 12, Charles Bramesco, “A Spoonful of Nostalgia Helps the Calculated Mary Poppins Returns Go Down”, in The A.V. Club[1], archived from the original on 24 May 2019:
      She does the same thing as any parent worth their salt, and gets rambunctious youngsters engaged in daily drudgeries by refashioning the quotidian as adventure.

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ReferencesEdit

  • drudgery” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2020.