See also: Dual, duel, and duál

EnglishEdit

 
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Alternative formsEdit

  • du. (abbreviation, grammar)

EtymologyEdit

PIE word
*dwóh₁

Borrowed from Latin dualis (two), from duo (two) + adjective suffix -alis

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

dual (not comparable)

  1. Characterized by having two (usually equivalent) components.
    Synonyms: double, twin; see also Thesaurus:dual
    a dual-motor vehicle
  2. Pertaining to two, pertaining to a pair of.
    Synonyms: double, duplicate; see also Thesaurus:twofold
    dual engine failure
    dual citizenship
    • 2020, Grace Ying May, “Women Disciplining Men: A Biblical Pattern of Leadership”, in Aída Besançon Spencer, William David Spencer, editor, Christian Egalitarian Leadership: Empowering the Whole Church According to the Scriptures, page 48:
      Both Deborah and Samuel held dual roles as judges and prophets.
  3. (grammar) Pertaining to a grammatical number in certain languages that refers to two of something, such as a pair of shoes.
    Coordinate terms: singular, trial, plural
    Modern Arabic displays a dual number, as did Homeric Greek.
  4. (mathematics, physics) Exhibiting duality.
  5. (linear algebra) Being the space of all linear functionals of (some other space).
    • 2012, Doug Fisher, Hans-J. Lenz, Learning from Data: Artificial Intelligence and Statistics V, Springer Science & Business Media →ISBN, page 81
      Accordingly, a hyperplane in the sample space is dual to a subspace in the variable space.
  6. (category theory) Being the dual of some other category; containing the same objects but with source and target reversed for all morphisms.
    Synonym: opposite
    • 1992, Colin McLarty, Elementary Categories, Elementary Toposes, Clarendon Press →ISBN, page 77
      Every category is dual to its own dual, so if a statement holds in all categories so does its dual.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

NounEdit

dual (plural duals)

  1. Of an item that is one of a pair, the other item in the pair.
  2. (geometry) Of a regular polyhedron with V vertices and F faces, the regular polyhedron having F vertices and V faces.
    The octahedron is the dual of the cube.
  3. (Can we clean up(+) this sense?) (grammar) The dual number.
  4. (mathematics) Of a vector in an inner product space, the linear functional corresponding to taking the inner product with that vector. The set of all duals is a vector space called the dual space.

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

dual (third-person singular simple present duals, present participle (UK) dualling or (US) dualing, simple past and past participle (UK) dualled or (US) dualed)

  1. (transitive) To convert from single to dual; specifically, to convert a single-carriageway road to a dual carriageway.
    • 1994, Great Britain. Parliament. House of Commons, Parliamentary Debates
      I have to declare an interest and I do so with some ambivalence because if the road is dualled it is likely to take half of my front garden.
    • 2006, David Lowe, Intermodal Freight Transport, p. 163
      The power generation and propulsion systems are dualled to accommodate component failure and maintain propulsion at reduced speed should any part of one system be lost.
    • 2021 September 22, “Network News: Nexus increases Tyne and Wear Metro train order to 46”, in RAIL, number 940, page 23:
      The investment will allow Nexus to increase service frequencies, reduce journey times, and improve reliability by dualling three sections of line between Pelaw and South Shields.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

dual (feminine duale, masculine plural duaux, feminine plural duales)

  1. dual

NounEdit

dual m (plural duaux)

  1. dual

Further readingEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

dual (strong nominative masculine singular dualer, not comparable)

  1. dual

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit

  • dual” in Duden online
  • dual” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Irish dúal (tress, lock of hair), from Proto-Celtic *doklos, from Proto-Indo-European *doḱlos (compare Icelandic tagl (horse’s tail), Old English tæġl, English tail).

NounEdit

dual m (genitive singular duail, nominative plural duail)

  1. lock, tress
    Synonyms: dlaoi, dual gruaige
  2. wisp, tuft
    Synonym: dlaoi
  3. ply, strand
  4. twist, twine
  5. spiral, whirl
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

dual (present analytic dualann, future analytic dualfaidh, verbal noun dualadh, past participle dualta)

  1. (transitive) twine
  2. (transitive) braid, coil
  3. (transitive) interlace, fold
ConjugationEdit

Etymology 2Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

dual m (genitive singular duail, nominative plural duail)

  1. dowel
  2. knot (in timber)
    Synonyms: alt, cranra
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Old Irish dúal (that which belongs or is proper to an individual by nature or descent), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰewgʰ-.

AdjectiveEdit

dual (genitive singular masculine duail, genitive singular feminine duaile, plural duala, comparative duaile)

  1. native, natural
    Is dual dó a bheith leisciúil.He is naturally lazy.
    dual don diabhal bheith díomhaoin.
    No rest for the wicked.
    (literally, “It is not in the devil's nature to be idle.”)
  2. proper, fitting
  3. in the natural order of things
  4. fated
  5. possible
DeclensionEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
dual dhual ndual
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • Rhymes: (Portugal) -al, (Brazil) -aw
  • Hyphenation: du‧al

AdjectiveEdit

dual m or f (plural duais, not comparable)

  1. dual (having two elements)

Derived termsEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French duel, from Latin dualis.

NounEdit

dual n (plural duale)

  1. (grammar) dual

DeclensionEdit


Scottish GaelicEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Irish dúal (that which belongs or is proper to an individual by nature or descent), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰewgʰ-.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

dual (comparative duaile)

  1. hereditary
  2. usual, natural
    'S dual do phoileasman a bhith amharasach.It's natural for a policeman to be suspicious.

NounEdit

dual m (genitive singular duail, plural dualan)

  1. birthright
    Synonym: còir-bhreith
  2. due
  3. something which is natural and/or usual
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Irish dúal (tress, lock of hair), from Proto-Celtic *doklos, from Proto-Indo-European *doḱlos.

NounEdit

dual m (genitive singular duail, plural dualan)

  1. curl, lock of hair
  2. plait, strand, braid, or fold
  3. ringlet

VerbEdit

dual (past dhual, future dualidh, verbal noun dualadh, past participle dualte)

  1. plait, twist
  2. loop, curl
  3. fold
  4. link

MutationEdit

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
dual dhual
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

Further readingEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin duālis.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

dual (plural duales)

  1. dual
  2. (grammar) dual

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit