See also: -dül and dual

English

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Middle French duel, from Medieval Latin duellum (fight between two men), under influence from Latin duo, from Old Latin duellum (whence Latin bellum (war)).(Can this(+) etymology be sourced?)

Pronunciation

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Noun

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duel (plural duels)

  1. Arranged, regular combat between two private persons, often over a matter of honor.
    • 1844 January–December, W[illiam] M[akepeace] Thackeray, “In Which I Show Myself to Be a Man of Spirit”, in “The Memoirs of Barry Lyndon, Esq. [The Luck of Barry Lyndon.]”, in Miscellanies: Prose and Verse, volume III, London: Bradbury and Evans, [], published 1856, →OCLC, page 36:
      I have often thought since, how different my fate might have been, had I not fallen in love with Nora at that early age; and had I not flung the wine in Quin’s face, and so brought on the duel.
    • 2004 July 5, Jason George, “A Duel Evokes Dueling Emotions Over a Unique Place in History”, in The New York Times[1], →ISSN:
      It has been 200 years, minus a few days, since Vice President Aaron Burr fatally shot Alexander Hamilton in a duel here. Weehawken and the duel have been tied together in an often-uncomfortable knot ever since.
  2. Historically, the wager of battle (judicial combat).
  3. (by extension) Any battle or struggle between two contending persons, forces, groups, or ideas.
    a sniper duel
    • 2019 March 6, Drachinifel, 25:33 from the start, in The Battle of Samar (Alternate History) - Bring on the Battleships![2], archived from the original on 20 July 2022:
      But it leaves them with a few destroyers, the American destroyer force is falling back, and then you have the two cruiser lines with their respective battleships coming in for the big duel.
    • 2021 May 1, John Naughton, “Apple comes out swinging in the duel of the data titans”, in The Guardian[3]:
      Apple comes out swinging in the duel of the data titans [title]

Translations

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Verb

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duel (third-person singular simple present duels, present participle (US) dueling or (UK) duelling, simple past and past participle (US) dueled or (UK) duelled)

  1. To engage in a battle.
    The two dogs were duelling for the bone.
    • 2019 February 19, “Lightsaber duelling registered as official sport in France”, in The Guardian[4]:
      The country’s fencing federation has officially recognised lightsaber duelling as a competitive sport, granting the weapon from George Lucas’s space saga the same status as the foil, epee and sabre, the traditional blades used at the Olympics.

Derived terms

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Translations

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Anagrams

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Catalan

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Italian duello, from Medieval Latin duellum (fight between two men), under influence from Latin duo.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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duel m (plural duels)

  1. duel

Derived terms

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Further reading

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Danish

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Middle French duel, from Latin duellum (war).(Can this(+) etymology be sourced?)

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /duɛl/, [d̥uˈɛlˀ]

Noun

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duel c (singular definite duellen, plural indefinite dueller)

  1. duel

Inflection

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Synonyms

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Derived terms

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Further reading

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Dutch

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Middle French duel, from Latin duellum (duel; war), archaic form of bellum (war). In Mediaeval Latin the meaning shifted from “war” to “duel” because of folk etymology associating it with duo (two).

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /dyˈ(ʋ)ɛl/
  • Audio:(file)
  • Hyphenation: du‧el
  • Rhymes: -ɛl

Noun

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duel n (plural duels, diminutive duelletje n)

  1. A duel.

Synonyms

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Derived terms

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French

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French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

Etymology

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Borrowed from Latin duālis.

Pronunciation

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  This entry needs an audio pronunciation. If you are a native speaker with a microphone, please record this word. The recorded pronunciation will appear here when it's ready.

Adjective

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duel (feminine duelle, masculine plural duels, feminine plural duelles)

  1. dual (having two components)
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Noun

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duel m (plural duels)

  1. duel (battle)
  2. (grammar) dual

Further reading

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Old French

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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Probably from Late Latin dolus, from Latin dolor (pain), or from Vulgar Latin *dolium, from Latin cordolium (sorrow of the heart), from dolor.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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duel oblique singularm (oblique plural dueus or duex or duels, nominative singular dueus or duex or duels, nominative plural duel)

  1. sadness; grief; sorrow

Descendants

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  • French: deuil
  • Norman: deu

Romanian

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Etymology

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Borrowed from French duel, from Latin duellum.

Noun

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duel n (plural dueluri)

  1. duel

Declension

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