See also: Dulce

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Alteration of earlier douce, from Middle English douce, from Old French douz, douce. Doublet of doux.

AdjectiveEdit

dulce (comparative more dulce, superlative most dulce)

  1. (obsolete) sweet

NounEdit

dulce (uncountable)

  1. (obsolete) sweetness

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English doucen, from the adjective (see above).

VerbEdit

dulce (third-person singular simple present dulces, present participle dulcing, simple past and past participle dulced)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To make sweet; to soothe.

Etymology 3Edit

Alteration of dulse.

NounEdit

dulce (countable and uncountable, plural dulces)

  1. Alternative form of dulse
  2. seaweed; kelp

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for dulce in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dulcis, dulcem, from Proto-Indo-European *dl̥kú-.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

dulce (epicene, plural dulces)

  1. sweet

Related termsEdit


LatinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From the neuter accusative case form of dulcis.

AdverbEdit

dulce (not comparable)

  1. Synonym of dulciter: sweetly, agreeably, delightfully
    • ~70 BCE, Gaius Valerius Catullus, Codex Vaticanus Ottobonianus Latinus 1829 Carmina 51:
      Ille mi par esse deo videtur, / ille, si fas est, superare divos, / qui sedens adversus identidem te / spectat et audit // dulce ridentem, misero quod omnes / eripit sensus mihi: nam simul te, / Lesbia, aspexi, nihil est super mi / <vocis in ore;> // lingua sed torpet, tenuis sub artus / flamma demanat, sonitu suopte / tintinant aures, gemina teguntur / lumina nocte.
      He seems to me to be equal to a god, / he, if it is permissible, / seems to surpass the gods, / who sitting opposite again and again / watches and hears you // sweetly laughing, which rips out all senses / from miserable me: for at the same moment I look upon you, / Lesbia, nothing is left for me / <of my voice in my mouth;> // But my tongue grows / thick, a thin flame / runs down beneath my limbs, with their own sound / my ears ring, my lights (eyes) / are covered by twin night.
    • c. 125 CE – 180 CE, Apuleius, Metamorphoses 5.1:
      tanta mentis perturbatione sedata, dulce conquievit.
      with so great a disturbance of mind having been calmed, she rested pleasantly.

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

AdjectiveEdit

dulce

  1. nominative/accusative/vocative neuter singular of dulcis

ReferencesEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dulcis, dulcem, from Proto-Indo-European *dl̥kú-.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

dulce m or f or n (plural dulci)

  1. sweet

InflectionEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dulcis, dulcem, from Proto-Indo-European *dl̥kú-. Also found in Old Spanish with the forms duz, duce (compare Portuguese doce)[1]. Cognate with English dulcet.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

dulce (plural dulces) (superlative dulcísimo)

  1. sweet (having a pleasant taste, especially induced by sugar)
    • 2004, Akira Yamaoka, Tender Sugar (translated from English)
      Me salva la dulce azúcar, es la habitación que me confina
    Antonym: salado
  2. (of water) fresh (without salt)
    Antonym: salada
  3. sweet (having a pleasant disposition)

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

dulce m (plural dulces)

  1. candy, sweet
    Synonyms: caramelo, chuche (Spain)
  2. sweet food, dessert
  3. thick jelly or fudge
    Synonyms: ate, manjar

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • O'odham: lu꞉lsi

Further readingEdit

ReferencesEdit