See also: elixír, elíxir, and élixir

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Medieval Latin elixir, from Arabic اَلْإِكْسِير(al-ʾiksīr), from Ancient Greek ξηρίον (xēríon, medicinal powder), from ξηρός (xērós, dry).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

elixir (plural elixirs)

  1. (alchemy) A liquid which converts lead to gold.
    • 2002, Philip Ball, The Elements: A Very Short Introduction, Oxford 2004, p. 59:
      For Chinese alchemists, gold held the key to the Elixir, the Eastern equivalent of the Philosopher's Stone.
  2. (alchemy) A substance or liquid which is believed to cure all ills and give eternal life.
  3. (by extension) The alleged cure for all ailments; cure-all, panacea.
    • 2015, The Boston Globe, Steven Pinker, The moral imperative for bioethics:
      The silver-bullet cancer cures of yesterday’s newsmagazine covers, like interferon and angiogenesis inhibitors, disappointed the breathless expectations, as have elixirs such as antioxidants, Vioxx, and hormone replacement therapy.
  4. (pharmacy) A sweet flavored liquid (usually containing a small amount of alcohol) used in compounding medicines to be taken by mouth in order to mask an unpleasant taste.
    • 1906, JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association (volume 47, pages 872-875)
      The subcommittee's report to the Council on Pharmacy and Chemistry shows that the action of somnos is practically identical with that of a 5 per cent elixir of hydrated chloral.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

AsturianEdit

VerbEdit

elixir

  1. to choose
  2. to elect

SynonymsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Medieval Latin elixir, from Arabic اَلْإِكْسِير(al-ʾiksīr), from Ancient Greek ξηρίον (xēríon, medicinal powder), from ξηρός (xērós, dry)

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: elixir

NounEdit

elixir n (plural elixirs, diminutive elixirtje n)

  1. elixir

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


GalicianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Latin eligo. Doublet of esleer.

Compare Portuguese eleger and Spanish elegir.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

elixir (first-person singular present elixo, first-person singular preterite elixín, past participle elixido)

  1. to choose, elect
    • 1418, Á. Rodríguez González (ed.), Libro do Concello de Santiago (1416-1422). Santiago de Compostela: Consello da Cultura Galega, page 85:
      para que dos ditos dose omes o dito señor arçobispo o a quel que seu poder para elo touvese tomase et eligise dous deles que os lle aprovuese et os dese por alcalles enna dita çidade en quel anno
      so that of that twelve men said lord archbishop, or anyone who his power has at the momment, takes and chooses two of them, and that he approves and gives them as mayors of said city for that year
    Synonym: escoller
ConjugationEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Medieval Latin elixir, from Arabic اَلْإِكْسِير(al-ʾiksīr), from Ancient Greek ξηρίον (xēríon, medicinal powder), from ξηρός (xērós, dry).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

elixir m (plural elixires)

  1. elixir

ReferencesEdit

  • eligir” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • elig” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • elexir” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • elixir” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • elixir” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

elixir m (plural elixires)

  1. (alchemy) elixir (liquid which was believed to turn non-precious metals to gold)
  2. (fiction) a magical potion

SpanishEdit

NounEdit

elixir m (plural elixires)

  1. Alternative spelling of elíxir