embroil

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from French embrouiller.

VerbEdit

embroil ‎(third-person singular simple present embroils, present participle embroiling, simple past and past participle embroiled)

  1. To draw into a situation; to cause to be involved.
    Avoid him. He will embroil you in his fights.
    • 2016 January 31, "Is Huma Abedin Hillary Clinton’s Secret Weapon or Her Next Big Problem?," Vanity Fair (retrieved 21 January 2016):
      Whether it’s palatable for the vice-chairman of Hillary’s presidential campaign to be embroiled in allegations of conflicts of interest, obtaining patronage jobs, or misrepresenting time worked remains to be seen.
    • Dryden
      the royal house embroiled in civil war
  2. To implicate in confusion; to complicate; to jumble.
    • Addison
      The Christian antiquities at Rome [] are so embroiled with fable and legend.

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