entsetzen

See also: Entsetzen

GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

ent- +‎ setzen, thus etymologically “to bring somebody out (of a state, a condition)”, and hence the two senses of to horrify (i.e. to bring out of tranquility) and to relieve (i.e. to bring out of a siege). Both senses are old and are already found in Old High German intsezzen. Compare Dutch ontzetten.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɛntˈzɛtsən/, [ɛndˈzɛtsən], [ɛndˈzɛtsn̩] (standard)
  • IPA(key): /ɛnˈtsɛtsən/ (also common; by assimilation)
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: ent‧set‧zen

VerbEdit

entsetzen (weak, third-person singular present entsetzt, past tense entsetzte, past participle entsetzt, auxiliary haben)

  1. to shock, to horrify, to appall
  2. (military, dated) to relieve (a town or fortress from a siege)

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • entsetzen” in Duden online
  • entsetzen” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

LuxembourgishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From ent- +‎ setzen, after German entsetzen.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /æntˈzætsen/, [ænˈd͡zæt͡sən]

VerbEdit

entsetzen (third-person singular present entsetzt, past participle entsat, auxiliary verb hunn)

  1. (transitive) to horrify, to appall
  2. (reflexive) to be horrified, to be appalled

ConjugationEdit

Regular
infinitive entsetzen
participle entsat
auxiliary hunn
present
indicative
imperative
1st singular entsetzen
2nd singular entsetz entsetz
3rd singular entsetzt
1st plural entsetzen
2nd plural entsetzt entsetzt
3rd plural entsetzen
(n) or (nn) indicates the Eifeler Regel.

Related termsEdit