EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin aequivocus, from aequus +‎ vocō.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /əˈkwɪvəkəl/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ɪˈkwɪvək(ə)l/
  • hyphenation UK: equivo‧cal

NounEdit

equivocal (plural equivocals)

  1. A word or expression capable of different meanings; an ambiguous term; an equivoque.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

equivocal (comparative more equivocal, superlative most equivocal)

  1. Having two or more equally applicable meanings; capable of double or multiple interpretation; ambiguous; uncertain.
    equivocal words; an equivocal sentence
    • (Can we date this quote by Francis Jeffrey and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      For the beauties of Shakespeare are not of so dim or equivocal a nature as to be visible only to learned eyes.
  2. Capable of being ascribed to different motives, or of signifying opposite feelings, purposes, or characters; deserving to be suspected.
    His actions are equivocal.
    • (Can we date this quote by John Milton and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      equivocal repentances
  3. Uncertain, as an indication or sign; doubtful, incongruous.
    • (Can we date this quote by Edmund Burke and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      How equivocal a test.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit