eternal

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English eternal, from Old French eternal, from Late Latin aeternālis, from Latin aeternus (eternal), from aevum (age).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

eternal (not comparable)

  1. Lasting forever; unending.
    • 1690, Locke, John, An Essay Concerning Human Understanding:
      But here again it is another question, quite different from our having an idea of eternity, to know whether there were any real being, whose duration has been eternal.
    • 1700 [c. 1387–1400], Dryden, John, transl., “Palamon and Arcite”, in Fables, Ancient and Modern, translation of The Knight's Tale by Geoffrey Chaucer:
      Thy smoking altar shall be fat with food / Of incense and the grateful steam of blood; / Burnt-offerings morn and evening shall be thine, / And fires eternal in thy temple shine.
    • 2012 May 27, Nathan Rabin, “TV: Review: THE SIMPSONS (CLASSIC): “New Kid On The Block” (season 4, episode 8; originally aired 11/12/1992)”, in The Onion AV Club[1]:
      In a bid to understand the eternal mystery that is woman, Bart goes to the least qualified possible source for advice and counsel: his father, who remarkably seems to have made it to his mid-30s without quite figuring out much of anything.
    Synonyms: agelong, endless, everlasting, permanent, sempiternal, unending; see also Thesaurus:eternal
    Antonyms: ephemeral, momentary, transient; see also Thesaurus:ephemeral
  2. (philosophy) existing outside time; as opposed to sempiternal, existing within time but everlastingly
    Synonyms: timeless, atemporal; see also Thesaurus:timeless
  3. (hyperbolic) Constant; perpetual; ceaseless; ever-present.
    • 1912, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Lost World[2]:
      Beneath him you might have seen the three of us - myself, sunburnt, young, and vigorous after our open-air tramp; Summerlee, solemn but still critical, behind his eternal pipe; Lord John, as keen as a razor-edge, with his supple, alert figure leaning upon his rifle, and his eager eyes fixed eagerly upon the speaker.
  4. (dated) Exceedingly great or bad; used as an intensifier.
    some eternal villain
    Synonym: awful

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

eternal (plural eternals)

  1. One who lives forever; an immortal.
    • 2012, D. E. Phoenix, Revelations of the Fallen: The Blasphemy of Astrial Belthromoto:
      Yes, I want that raw power that is only offered to the eternals or creators

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin aeternālis, attested from the 14th century.[1]

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

eternal (masculine and feminine plural eternals)

  1. eternal
    Synonym: etern

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ “eternal” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.

Further readingEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin aeternālis.

AdjectiveEdit

eternal m or f (plural eternais)

  1. (formal) eternal
    Synonym: eterno

Further readingEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old French eternal, eternel, from Latin aeternālis; equivalent to eterne +‎ -al.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɛːtɛrˈnaːl/, /ɛːˈtɛrnal/, /ɛːtɛrˈnɛːl/

AdjectiveEdit

eternal

  1. Eternal, permanent; having existed (and existing) forever.
  2. Endless, unending; lasting forever.
  3. (rare) Long-lasting; non-ephemeral.

SynonymsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: eternal, tarnal
  • Scots: eternal

ReferencesEdit


OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin aeternālis.

AdjectiveEdit

eternal m (feminine singular eternala, masculine plural eternals, feminine plural eternalas)

  1. eternal
    Synonym: etèrn

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin aeternālis.

AdjectiveEdit

eternal m or f (plural eternais, not comparable)

  1. eternal
    Synonym: eterno

Further readingEdit

  • eternal” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin aeternālis.

AdjectiveEdit

eternal (plural eternales)

  1. eternal
    Synonym: eterno

Further readingEdit