See also: Eth, ETH, -eth, eth-, Eth., , and

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

The sound /ɛ/ followed by the sound of the letter, by analogy with other letter names, such as those of f, l, and m.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɛð/, (less commonly) /ɛθ/[1]
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛð

NounEdit

eth (plural eths)

  1. A letter (capital Ð, small ð) introduced into Old English to represent its dental fricative, then not distinguished from the letter thorn, no longer used in English but still in modern use in Icelandic, the IPA and other phonetic alphabets to represent the voiced dental fricative "th" sound as in the English word then. The letter is also used in Faroese, but is generally silent in that language.

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Uncertain. Perhaps related to end (to weave).

VerbEdit

eth (first-person singular past tense etha, participle ethur)

  1. to mate (cattle)

Etymology 2Edit

Unclear. Perhaps related to Proto-Germanic *audaz (wealth, riches), hence Old Saxon ōd, Old High German ōt, Old Norse auðr Icelandic auður.

NounEdit

eth m

  1. (chiefly dialectal) property
Related termsEdit

CornishEdit

Cornish cardinal numbers
 <  7 8 9  > 
    Cardinal : eth

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Brythonic *üiθ, from Proto-Celtic *oxtū (compare Welsh wyth), from Proto-Indo-European *oḱtṓw.

NumeralEdit

eth

  1. eight

See alsoEdit

  • (cardinal number): Previous: seyth. Next: naw

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

eth f (singulative ethen)

  1. scents

OccitanEdit

ArticleEdit

eth m (feminine singular era, masculine plural eths, feminine plural eras)

  1. (Gascony) the
    Synonym: lo

Derived termsEdit

PronounEdit

eth

  1. (Gascony) he

Old IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

·eth

  1. passive singular preterite conjunct of téit

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
eth unchanged n-eth
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Old SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *aiþaz.

NounEdit

eth m

  1. oath

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle Low German: êt
    • German Low German: Eed
    • Plautdietsch: Eit