See also: Eva, EVA, Éva, evä, -eva, eva', and ẽvã

EnglishEdit

AdverbEdit

eva (not comparable)

  1. Pronunciation spelling of ever.

AnagramsEdit


CornishEdit

VerbEdit

eva

  1. to drink

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Eva (Eve), referring to the fig leaves the postlapsarian Eve wore to cover her vulva in the Biblical story.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈeː.vaː/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: eva

NounEdit

eva f (plural eva's, diminutive evaatje n)

  1. A half-apron.

Norwegian NynorskEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Eva (Eve), of the biblical creation story.[1] The name comes from Latin Eva, from Ancient Greek Εὔα (Eúa), from Biblical Hebrew חַוָּה(ḥawwā).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

eva f (definite singular evaa, indefinite plural evaer, definite plural evaene)

  1. a woman, particularly with very womanly traits

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse efa, ifa.[1]

Alternative formsEdit

  • eve (e-infinitive)

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

eva (present tense evar, past tense eva, past participle eva, passive infinitive evast, present participle evande, imperative ev)

  1. (reflexive) to doubt, drag one's feet
Usage notesEdit
  • This is a split infinitive verb.

Etymology 3Edit

Related to eva (Etymology 2) and ev.

NounEdit

eva f (definite singular eva, indefinite plural ever or evor, definite plural evene or evone)

  1. form removed with the spelling reform of 2012; superseded by eve
  2. definite singular of eve

Etymology 4Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

eva n

  1. definite plural of ev

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 “eva” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

AnagramsEdit


PiedmonteseEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin aqua. Compare French eau, Romansch ava, ova.

NounEdit

eva

  1. water